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Just reminding erryone of my current location #rio #papafrancis #skyline #beautiful

Posted by on 7-22-13

El Jueves salgo para Puerto Rico y estare participando del JMJ en PR. Un Evento unido al JMJ de Brasil. Seran dias de mucha gracia, poder y misericordia. Contamos con sus oraciones! Para mas info porfavor visiten www.jmj2013pr.com #jmj #jmj2013pr #brasil #puertorico #unasolaiglesia #jovenes #catholic #catolico #papafrancis

Posted by on 7-22-13

“Não tenho ouro nem prata.. Vim aqui transmitir o maior presente que recebi nessa vida: Jesus Cristo” – Papa Francisco, no Palácio Guanabara, na sua chegada no Rio de Janeiro

Posted by on 7-22-13

Nada mejor que coger cosas de los hoteles y encontrartelas un tiempo mas tarde #recuerdoson #abril2013 #antequera #campeonatoespañaporescuelas #catalunya #buenequipo #genialrelevo #granada #bocadecaballo #dientesdeleon #mojopicon #bananas #pasajeros #titofrancis #papafrancis #yayofrancis #quierovolver

Posted by on 7-22-13

El papa Francisco acaba de recitar: “Necesitamos santos sin velo, sin sotana. Necesitamos santos de jeans y zapatillas. Necesitamos santos que vayan al cine, escuchen musica y paseen con sus amigos. Necesitamos santos que coloquen a Dios en primer lugar y que sobresalgan en la Universidad. Necesitamos santos que busquen tiempo cada dia para rezar y que sepan enamorar en la pureza y castidad, o que consagren su castidad. Necesitamos santos modernos, santos del siglo XXI con una espiritualidad insertada en nuestro tiempo. Necesitamos santos comprometidos con los pobres y los necesarios cambios sociales. Necesitamos santos que vivan en el mundo, se santifiquen en el mundo y que no tengan miedo de vivir en el mundo. Necesitamos santos que tomen Coca Cola y coman hot-dogs, que sean internautas, que escuchen iPod. Necesitamos santos que amen la Eucaristia y que no tengan vergüenza de tomar una cerveza o comer pizza el fin de semana con los amigos. Necesitamos santos a los que les guste el cine, el teatro, la musica, la danza, el deporte. Necesitamos santos sociables, abiertos, normales, amigos, alegres, compañeros. Necesitamos santos que esten en el mundo y que sepan saborear las cosas puras y buenas del mundo, pero sin ser mundanos”. Amen!!!!!!! (Esta parte la dije yo) :) #santidadenjeans #santidad #PapaFrancis #Iglesia #yes #holiness

Posted by on 7-21-13

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Jean Vanier: The One I Reject Is the One Who Heals...

Posted on Jul 30, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

The following is an excerpt from Jean Vanier’s new book The Gospel of John, The Gospel of Relationship, published by Franciscan Media.

We are all filled with fears, prejudices, and wounds. We are afraid of our own limits, fragility, and mortality. We are afraid of those who are different, of people with disabilities, of people like Eric. If we let go of our defenses, we meet within ourselves those parts of us that are also wounded, disabled, and weak. It is extraordinary to discover within ourselves the wounded person we have been hiding! As we welcome those around us who are wounded, we can enter into a relationship with the wounded person within ourselves.

At L’Arche, we have discovered that we are healed by the ones who have been rejected and put aside, as long as we enter into a relationship of mutual vulnerability with them and live a covenant of love with them. They heal us in a mysterious fashion, since they lead us into our deepest being where God resides. It is the presence of Jesus in the wounded that heals the wounds within us and allows us to discover Jesus within us. We are transformed by those who are weak and rejected, just as this woman was transformed by Jesus.

St. Pope John Paul II describes well this teaching power of the weak:

Disabled people are humanity’s privileged witnesses.
They can teach everyone about the love that saves us;
they can become heralds of a new world, no longer
dominated by force, violence and aggression, but by
love, solidarity and acceptance, a new world transfigured
by the light of Christ, the Son of God who
became incarnate, who was crucified and rose for us.

For more on Jean Vanier’s book, click here.

*****
Photo: PHOTOCREO Michal Bednarek/Shutterstock

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Jean Vanier: The One I Reject Is the One Who Heals...

Posted on Jul 30, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

The following is an excerpt from Jean Vanier’s new book The Gospel of John, The Gospel of Relationship, published by Franciscan Media.

We are all filled with fears, prejudices, and wounds. We are afraid of our own limits, fragility, and mortality. We are afraid of those who are different, of people with disabilities, of people like Eric. If we let go of our defenses, we meet within ourselves those parts of us that are also wounded, disabled, and weak. It is extraordinary to discover within ourselves the wounded person we have been hiding! As we welcome those around us who are wounded, we can enter into a relationship with the wounded person within ourselves.

At L’Arche, we have discovered that we are healed by the ones who have been rejected and put aside, as long as we enter into a relationship of mutual vulnerability with them and live a covenant of love with them. They heal us in a mysterious fashion, since they lead us into our deepest being where God resides. It is the presence of Jesus in the wounded that heals the wounds within us and allows us to discover Jesus within us. We are transformed by those who are weak and rejected, just as this woman was transformed by Jesus.

St. Pope John Paul II describes well this teaching power of the weak:

Disabled people are humanity’s privileged witnesses.
They can teach everyone about the love that saves us;
they can become heralds of a new world, no longer
dominated by force, violence and aggression, but by
love, solidarity and acceptance, a new world transfigured
by the light of Christ, the Son of God who
became incarnate, who was crucified and rose for us.

For more on Jean Vanier’s book, click here.

*****
Photo: PHOTOCREO Michal Bednarek/Shutterstock

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The Psalms: Prayer In God’s Own Words...

Posted on Jul 29, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Some people seem to have an almost natural love for the Psalms. They find their sentiments, desires, joys, sorrows expressed in ways with which they can identify. This is true even though the culture of ancient times is so different.

My purpose in this look at the Psalms is to help people to grow in appreciation of the Psalms, whether they have a natural love for them or find them foreign.

The present writing is an attempt to suggest some thoughts about the Psalms. The author does not intend a deep and systematic presentation. Rather, from what I have read, thought about and made my own, this is a rather personal approach.

Here are some ideas to think about as a start:

  1. In the Psalms, we pray to God in God’s own words.
  2. The Book of Psalms was Jesus’ own prayer book.
  3. The Jewish people and Christians have used these prayers for centuries.
  4. The Psalms are practically a summary of Israel’s history in prayer form.
  5. The Psalms are a preparation for the coming of Christ.
  6. Jesus referred to the Psalms in describing his own vocation.
  7. The New Testament finds images, ideas, various descriptions that help us appreciate who Jesus is and what they Church is all about.

Psalm 1

Many translations are available.

The first verse is most accurately translated: Blessed is the man who does not walk in the counsel of the wicked. Hebrew uses the masculine “man.”

This gives us pause right from the beginning. What about inclusive language? In general and in today’s situation, I think there is a place for inclusive language—not because of political correctness, but for religious reasons. The way people think today using the masculine pronoun when the reference is to both men and women tends to suggest that women are inferior to men. Because of that, some translate “Blessed are they who do not walk in the counsel of the wicked.” And surely everyone would agree that women as well as men are blessed when they avoid the counsel of the wicked.

The remaining verses are easily understood. There is even the beautiful image of a tree enjoying the presence of life-giving water. As the tree flourishes so do those who delight in doing the will of God.

Photo: Francesco Marino

We might expect the wicked to be like a dead tree. But the image is worse. They (the word is plural) are like chaff. When the farmer throws the ground wheat into the air, the chaff blows away. The wicked are less than worthless.

It is interesting to note that the last verse does use the plural. The Lord knows the way of the righteous. But the way of the wicked will perish.

When we look at the Psalms from the Jewish viewpoint, we might see it as setting the tone for praying all the psalms. We approach them with the desire to delight in the law of God and to strengthen our relationship with God through these prayers. In other words, Psalm 1 is a fine introduction to all of the Psalms.

Christians can approach the Psalm in the same ways. We can delight in God’s law and rejoice with our Jewish brothers and sisters, praising God for all God has done to save his people, thanking God for all God’s gifts, lamenting infidelities and begging forgiveness.

Christians, however, can take the Psalm further. When we think of Christ, we can see him as the man who delight in God’s law, deepened its meaning, practiced it a new way and, lead by the Spirit (symbolized by water), became the tree that never ceased to flourish.

When we look at the Psalm in this way, we may have no difficulty in praying: “Blessed is the man who does not walk in the way of the wicked…But his delight is in the law of the Lord.”

*****
Photo: Arvind Balaraman

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The Psalms: Prayer In God’s Own Words...

Posted on Jul 29, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Some people seem to have an almost natural love for the Psalms. They find their sentiments, desires, joys, sorrows expressed in ways with which they can identify. This is true even though the culture of ancient times is so different.

My purpose in this look at the Psalms is to help people to grow in appreciation of the Psalms, whether they have a natural love for them or find them foreign.

The present writing is an attempt to suggest some thoughts about the Psalms. The author does not intend a deep and systematic presentation. Rather, from what I have read, thought about and made my own, this is a rather personal approach.

Here are some ideas to think about as a start:

  1. In the Psalms, we pray to God in God’s own words.
  2. The Book of Psalms was Jesus’ own prayer book.
  3. The Jewish people and Christians have used these prayers for centuries.
  4. The Psalms are practically a summary of Israel’s history in prayer form.
  5. The Psalms are a preparation for the coming of Christ.
  6. Jesus referred to the Psalms in describing his own vocation.
  7. The New Testament finds images, ideas, various descriptions that help us appreciate who Jesus is and what they Church is all about.

Psalm 1

Many translations are available.

The first verse is most accurately translated: Blessed is the man who does not walk in the counsel of the wicked. Hebrew uses the masculine “man.”

This gives us pause right from the beginning. What about inclusive language? In general and in today’s situation, I think there is a place for inclusive language—not because of political correctness, but for religious reasons. The way people think today using the masculine pronoun when the reference is to both men and women tends to suggest that women are inferior to men. Because of that, some translate “Blessed are they who do not walk in the counsel of the wicked.” And surely everyone would agree that women as well as men are blessed when they avoid the counsel of the wicked.

The remaining verses are easily understood. There is even the beautiful image of a tree enjoying the presence of life-giving water. As the tree flourishes so do those who delight in doing the will of God.

Photo: Francesco Marino

We might expect the wicked to be like a dead tree. But the image is worse. They (the word is plural) are like chaff. When the farmer throws the ground wheat into the air, the chaff blows away. The wicked are less than worthless.

It is interesting to note that the last verse does use the plural. The Lord knows the way of the righteous. But the way of the wicked will perish.

When we look at the Psalms from the Jewish viewpoint, we might see it as setting the tone for praying all the psalms. We approach them with the desire to delight in the law of God and to strengthen our relationship with God through these prayers. In other words, Psalm 1 is a fine introduction to all of the Psalms.

Christians can approach the Psalm in the same ways. We can delight in God’s law and rejoice with our Jewish brothers and sisters, praising God for all God has done to save his people, thanking God for all God’s gifts, lamenting infidelities and begging forgiveness.

Christians, however, can take the Psalm further. When we think of Christ, we can see him as the man who delight in God’s law, deepened its meaning, practiced it a new way and, lead by the Spirit (symbolized by water), became the tree that never ceased to flourish.

When we look at the Psalm in this way, we may have no difficulty in praying: “Blessed is the man who does not walk in the way of the wicked…But his delight is in the law of the Lord.”

*****
Photo: Arvind Balaraman

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The Holy Words of St. Anthony...

Posted on Jul 28, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Near the end of his life, Anthony of Padua composed a collection of sermons or “sermon notes.” Having been an outstanding theology teacher and preacher for much of his life, Anthony wanted to help his Franciscan confreres in their preaching ministry. He wrote these so-called “sermon notes” for the benefit of his brothers. I’d like to share with you some passages of St. Anthony’s sermons.

Sunlight Reveals Dirt

Let me begin with this short passage from one of Anthony’s sermons:“When it is dark, we do not see how dusty and dirty our house is. Only when the place is flooded with sunlight do we realize its awful condition. So we need the light of God’s grace to show us the real state of our soul and to induce us to clean up our hearts!”Reflection: Anthony’s words inspire us to pause and reflect on how closely we do—or do not—measure up to Christ, who is our shining model in all things. But Jesus’ light is not simply a light that exposes our darkness and shortcomings or puts us in touch with our guilt. Jesus’ light is also a warm flood of comforting sunlight and forgiveness that replaces our darkness and wraps us in God’s healing love.

A Tiny Child Is ‘Lord of the Universe’

In another sermon passage, Anthony reflects on the mystery of Christ’s birth in a humble stable at Bethlehem. Anthony expresses amazement, for example, at “the Lord of the universe wrapped in swaddling clothes” and at “the King of Angels lying in a stable.” He also salutes “the one whose name is boundless and yet is laid in a narrow manger.”

Reflection: St. Anthony’s words seem to echo the following passage of St. Paul’s Letter to the Philippians, in which Paul urges us to embrace the attitude of Christ: Though “he was in the form of God, [he] did not regard equality with God as something to be grasped. Rather, he emptied himself, taking the form of a slave, coming in human likeness. And found human in appearance, he humbled himself, becoming obedient to death, even death on a cross” (Phil. 2:6-8).

Seek the Face of God

In another sermon passage of St. Anthony, we find these words: “Nothing apart from God can satisfy the human heart, which is truly in search of God.”

Reflection: As an Augustinian monk in Portugal for many years, Anthony would have surely pondered the famous quote of St. Augustine: “You have created us for yourself, O God, and our hearts are restless until they rest in thee.” May Anthony intercede for us so that each of us may truly seek the face of God and find our own contemplative gift—and, indeed, full union with our loving God.

*****
Image composite: Franciscan Media
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The Holy Words of St. Anthony...

Posted on Jul 28, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Near the end of his life, Anthony of Padua composed a collection of sermons or “sermon notes.” Having been an outstanding theology teacher and preacher for much of his life, Anthony wanted to help his Franciscan confreres in their preaching ministry. He wrote these so-called “sermon notes” for the benefit of his brothers. I’d like to share with you some passages of St. Anthony’s sermons.

Sunlight Reveals Dirt

Let me begin with this short passage from one of Anthony’s sermons:“When it is dark, we do not see how dusty and dirty our house is. Only when the place is flooded with sunlight do we realize its awful condition. So we need the light of God’s grace to show us the real state of our soul and to induce us to clean up our hearts!”Reflection: Anthony’s words inspire us to pause and reflect on how closely we do—or do not—measure up to Christ, who is our shining model in all things. But Jesus’ light is not simply a light that exposes our darkness and shortcomings or puts us in touch with our guilt. Jesus’ light is also a warm flood of comforting sunlight and forgiveness that replaces our darkness and wraps us in God’s healing love.

A Tiny Child Is ‘Lord of the Universe’

In another sermon passage, Anthony reflects on the mystery of Christ’s birth in a humble stable at Bethlehem. Anthony expresses amazement, for example, at “the Lord of the universe wrapped in swaddling clothes” and at “the King of Angels lying in a stable.” He also salutes “the one whose name is boundless and yet is laid in a narrow manger.”

Reflection: St. Anthony’s words seem to echo the following passage of St. Paul’s Letter to the Philippians, in which Paul urges us to embrace the attitude of Christ: Though “he was in the form of God, [he] did not regard equality with God as something to be grasped. Rather, he emptied himself, taking the form of a slave, coming in human likeness. And found human in appearance, he humbled himself, becoming obedient to death, even death on a cross” (Phil. 2:6-8).

Seek the Face of God

In another sermon passage of St. Anthony, we find these words: “Nothing apart from God can satisfy the human heart, which is truly in search of God.”

Reflection: As an Augustinian monk in Portugal for many years, Anthony would have surely pondered the famous quote of St. Augustine: “You have created us for yourself, O God, and our hearts are restless until they rest in thee.” May Anthony intercede for us so that each of us may truly seek the face of God and find our own contemplative gift—and, indeed, full union with our loving God.

*****
Image composite: Franciscan Media
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When Love Goes Wrong...

Posted on Jul 24, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

When I decided to write a book about the experience of shame and Christian spiritual growth, I didn’t talk about it much. Too negative, too discouraging—these were the reactions I figured I’d get. But I was wrong.

Instead, I’ve been amazed, mildly startled actually, by the consistently constructive, encouraging responses I’ve received once word slipped out that I was hard at work on such a book. “I’m glad you’re writing about that; it’s really important. So many people find it hard to take themselves seriously, let alone love themselves.” That’s the kind of feedback I’ve been getting.

For reasons that are infrequently known but frequently only intuited, just the word “shame” elicits an emotional resonance at some level in many of us. There are questions too: what makes it so difficult for us to live peacefully in God’s gaze without looking away or feeling the need to make ourselves different so God won’t turn away from us? In other words, why is love, especially being loved, such hard work? Why do so many of us think there’s something wrong with us—that we’re defective?

Years of helping others in spiritual direction have shown me that feeling unworthy of love is a chronic wound many Christians share but few talk about. Not only is it embarrassing to do so, but it also renders many of us much more vulnerable than our expertly trained personal defenses can tolerate. Sadly, safety regularly trumps trust, yet trust is our only sure path to God, healing, and peace.

*****
Photo: grafvision/Shutterstock

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A Sign for the Isle...

Posted on Jul 23, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Papa Stronsay now proudly displays its own sign!  Under the Papa Stronsay Arms can be read the three ancient names of Papa Stronsay:
Papey Minni.
Papey Minor.
Papey in Litla.

A Great sight as you approach the Papa Stronsay Pier!

Very Rev Fr. Michael Mary and the brothers erect the new sign on the pier wall.
Fr. Magdala Maria handles the drill and is assisted by Br Alfonso Maria and Very Rev Fr Michael Mary.
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Gallup Poll shows Pope Francis is not so “Laudat...

Posted on Jul 23, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

cover laudato siHave you seen the Gallup Poll on Pope Francis’ popularity? HERE

His favorability has, essentially, crashed.

Back in February 2015, Pew Research showed that 70% of all Americans and 90% of Catholics viewed Francis favorably.

Today, according Gallup, his favorability is at 71%.

So, in about 6 months – half a year – Francis’ popularity in these U.S.A., has, among Catholics, fallen nearly 20% (19% to be exact).   That’s in only 6 months.

Let us ask:

What happened between February and now?

Laudato si’.

There’s more.

Francis lost 14% among liberal Americans.

Let us also ask:

How do these numbers compare with polls from the beginning of Francis’ pontificate in March 2013?

In April 2013, among Americans, his favorables were at 58% and unfavorables at 10%. Today, his favorables are at 59% and unfavorables at 16%.

In other words, Americans like him as much now as when they knew nothing about him.

In that same period, however, his unfavorables have increased 6%.

Let the liberal excuses begin!

One possible excuse will be that Francis’ hasn’t been as prominent in the media as he was in 2013, so these numbers are superficial. In other words the media will blame the media. “If only the Pope could be on the cover of TIME a few more times!”

Speaking of the media blaming the media, this is from the David Gibson piece at the ultra liberal RNS:

“Stephen Schneck, head of the Institute for Policy Research & Catholic Studies at Catholic University of America in Washington, blamed pundits on the right and left, like Rush Limbaugh and Rachel Maddow, for “politicizing” the pope’s teachings.”

And this from the same liberals who assure us that talk show hosts don’t really have much influence!  Now they want to blame talk shows for the Pope’s loss of 19 points among Catholics since February?

REALLY?!?

Couldn’t it be that Americans are tired of being berated?

Consider:

According to the Public Religion Research Institute only 40% of white Catholics – who make up 2/3 of all Catholics in these USA – believe in global warming as a result of human activity.

So, it could be that the more people heard about Laudato si’ the less they liked the Pope.

Mind you, liberal catholics, such as the writers and readers of the National Schismatic Reporter (aka Fishwrap) will try to explain away this huge drop in popularity because Francis’ is being prophetic: “Francis has challenged Americans and taken them out of their complacency!”

Mind you, liberals don’t include themselves among normal Americans. They understand things far better than the hoi polloi. So, watch the Left get out the climbing equipment and oxygen tanks as they struggle up to even loftier moral high ground.

The Pope will probably get popularity bumps from his U.S. trip.

Right now, however, he’s trending downward.

It will be interesting to see how – and if – Pope Francis and his team will adjust their message.

Comment moderation is ON.

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The Chime Travelers Series Arrives!...

Posted on Jul 23, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Lisa M. Hendey, founder and editor of CatholicMom.com, give us a glimpse into her new Chime Travelers books, published by Servant.

When the bells chime, get ready for adventure and fun as you join Katie and Patrick on their travels back in time to far-distant lands. The mysterious strangers they meet along the way turn out to be saints of old who become close friends who help our young travelers understand their faith a little better. Are you ready for the trip of a lifetime? Be ready when you hear the bells chime.

Available Now!
The Sign of the Carved Cross
Katie makes a new friend as she finds herself in a Native American village in the year 1675. As she settles into village life, she discovers how strong her new friend’s faith is in the face of danger from her own family. As their friendship grows, Katie also learns a few things about being a better friend to others.

The Secret of the Shamrock
Patrick travels to Ireland with a frog named Francis and finds himself in a muddy field full of sheep with personality and a mysterious shepherd. As they race across Ireland in response to a secret call, you will find your own faith in God growing stronger.

Further Adventures Are on the Way!
Follow the fun at http://ift.tt/1TTgwwD

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Jean Vanier on St. Francis and the Leper...

Posted on Jul 22, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

The following is a excerpt from Jean Vanier’s book, The Gospel of John, The Gospel of Relationship, published by Franciscan Media.

Francis of Assisi said that he felt repulsed by those who were suffering from leprosy. In the Middle Ages, there were some twenty thousand leprosariums in Europe. He was disgusted; he did not want to be close to them. We can understand that because of the deformed faces of such people and the smell characteristic of the disease. Francis was therefore shocked and afraid and turned away from them. Then one day Francis said, “The Lord led me toward them, and I served them, and when I left I felt a new gentleness in my body and in my spirit.” When the walls of fear fall down, we can begin to meet each other and discover the vulnerable and wounded heart of the other.

We see such healing meetings in our L’Arche communities with regard to people with disabilities. Young people (age 15 or so) from local schools come to spend a day with us that, of course, includes meeting people with disabilities. After their visit, they complete an evaluation of their short stay. Many say, “Before coming to L’Arche I was very frightened.”

They were frightened of people with disabilities because they are different. In our world, so many people are frightened of others who are of a different culture, religion, or social class. Several years ago, I had the privilege of visiting Chile. On the road from the airport, my driver told me, “On the left are the slums, and on the right are the houses of the rich. Nobody crosses this road. Nobody.” The poor are frightened of the rich, and the rich are frightened of the poor. There is no meeting between the two. The road is like a wall.

We live in a world where we create walls because of our fears. Walls can surround our hearts when we are frightened of others.

To learn more about Jean Vanier’s book, click here.

*****
Painting by Larry Zink

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Jean Vanier on St. Francis and the Leper...

Posted on Jul 22, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

The following is a excerpt from Jean Vanier’s book, The Gospel of John, The Gospel of Relationship, published by Franciscan Media.

Francis of Assisi said that he felt repulsed by those who were suffering from leprosy. In the Middle Ages, there were some twenty thousand leprosariums in Europe. He was disgusted; he did not want to be close to them. We can understand that because of the deformed faces of such people and the smell characteristic of the disease. Francis was therefore shocked and afraid and turned away from them. Then one day Francis said, “The Lord led me toward them, and I served them, and when I left I felt a new gentleness in my body and in my spirit.” When the walls of fear fall down, we can begin to meet each other and discover the vulnerable and wounded heart of the other.

We see such healing meetings in our L’Arche communities with regard to people with disabilities. Young people (age 15 or so) from local schools come to spend a day with us that, of course, includes meeting people with disabilities. After their visit, they complete an evaluation of their short stay. Many say, “Before coming to L’Arche I was very frightened.”

They were frightened of people with disabilities because they are different. In our world, so many people are frightened of others who are of a different culture, religion, or social class. Several years ago, I had the privilege of visiting Chile. On the road from the airport, my driver told me, “On the left are the slums, and on the right are the houses of the rich. Nobody crosses this road. Nobody.” The poor are frightened of the rich, and the rich are frightened of the poor. There is no meeting between the two. The road is like a wall.

We live in a world where we create walls because of our fears. Walls can surround our hearts when we are frightened of others.

To learn more about Jean Vanier’s book, click here.

*****
Painting by Larry Zink

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KNIGHTS OF THE EUCHARISTIC HEART OF JESUS...

Posted on Jul 21, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

On the Feast of the Most Holy Redeemer, the third Sunday in July, 19th July 2015, at the Oratory of Our Mother of Perpetual Succour, Emeritus Bishop Basil Meeking, DD, inaugurated the Knights of the Eucharistic Heart of JesusThe Knights of the Eucharistic Heart of Jesus is an organization which has been formed by the Congregation of the Sons of the Most Holy Redeemer. Its object is to provide a solid formation for boys and men who wish to serve Our Blessed Lord at His altar. It has been created in response to the need to train boys and men worthy of the duty of serving at the Traditional Rite of Holy Mass. A society called Knights of the Altar was begun under St John Bosco in 1858, and this name was used in the United States of America by a Fr Benz in 1939, who formed an Altar serving society. Our Society is largely based on the Knights of the Altar.

Why Knights?

Medieval Knighthood, in the service of manor lords, calls forth such ideals as honour, loyalty, justice, chivalry, and respect for all. In the use of the term knight, the Altar Server is reminded of his duty to serve the Lord of lords with fidelity and honour, to treat others with respect and justice, and to live an upright personal life, defending always the rights of God and His Holy Church. In the names page and squire, the server is reminded again of the years of practice and study that went into the training of a knight and should consider with what devotion and perseverance he should attend to his own training in the service of the Altar. The chevalier was a travelling knight, which should remind the server that he should be ever travelling toward his heavenly goal.

Purpose of the Society

(1) To form a worthy guard of honour to our Divine Eucharistic King in whose service we willingly assume the dignity and honour of becoming Knights of the Eucharistic Heart of Jesus;
(2) To render faithful, reverent and edifying service to God by assisting His visible representatives, the Bishops and Priests, in offering the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass and in all other liturgical and devotional functions;
(3) To enkindle in the hearts of the faithful whom we represent at the altar, greater piety and devotion by reverently performing the duties of our holy office and by giving good example in our daily lives;
(4) Finally, to ensure the continued and efficient function of the Knights of the Eucharistic Heart of Jesus as a society by attending meetings and giving of our service to the Church.

Below are photos taken at this memorable ceremony.

Some of the younger altar servers processing to Holy Mass.

Emeritus Bishop Basil Meeking, DD.

Prayers at the foot of the Altar.

Incensation at the beginning of Mass.

The Sanctissimum is removed for a Pontifical Mass at the Faldstool.

Seated for the singing of the Gloria.

Future Knights of the Eucharistic Heart of Jesus.

Bishop Meeking sings the collects; of the Mass
and of his anniversary of ordination to the Priesthood, 62 years today.

The Servers stand attentively at the Service of Jesus Christ the King.

Fr Anthony Mary, F.SS.R. is dubbed the Knight Director.

Seven boys became Apprentices. This is the first step
to becoming a Knight. The apprentice needs to learn all the
Latin responses by heart for Low Mass.

Two of the five Pages who have learnt their Latin response by heart
 and know how to serve Acolyte 2

The Pages receive from the Bishop
the Cassock, Surplice, Medal of the Eucharistic Heart, as well as the Handbook.
The Bishops addresses the pages: “Wear this cassock, in which you are vested, with the greatest respect, for it is part of the armour you shall wear as a Knight of the Eucharistic Heart of Jesus in the service of your Lord and Master Jesus Christ.
May Our Lord clothe you with the grace you need for your new dignity as his servant, just as you will now be clothed in this surplice. May you show yourselves worthy by the proof of your life, and may its whiteness be ever a true symbol of the gleaming purity of your soul.”

Jose and Jerome O’Sullivan became Squires.
They receive the single red tassel for this rank.

Justin Evans and Josef Fairbrother having been received as Pages.

Mervin de Lancea is dubbed a Knight by the Bishop.

A Scottish Broad Sword used for the dubbing.

The elevation of the Precious Blood.

The excellent choir that sang various parts of the Mass in polyphony. 

The new Apprentices, Pages, Squires and Knights.
“We, the Knights of the Eucharistic Heart of Jesus, pledge allegiance to our Lord and Master, Jesus Christ, to His representatives on earth, and to Mary, our Queen Immaculate, whom we will serve faithfully until we attain eternal triumph in heaven. We pledge ourselves to form a worthy guard of honour to our Divine Eucharistic King in whose service we willingly assume the dignity and honour of becoming Knights of the Eucharistic Heart of Jesus; to render faithful, reverent and edifying service to God by assisting His visible representatives, the Bishops and Priests, in offering the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass and in all other liturgical and devotional functions; to enkindle in the hearts of the faithful, whom we represent at the altar, greater piety and devotion by reverently performing the duties of our holy office and by giving good example in our daily lives.”
“Tu es sacerdos in aeternum!”
After the Mass congratulating the Bishop
 for his fidelity and service of 62 years a priest.

Seven new Apprentices
Arlen Dempsey, John Fairborther, Joseph le Grelle, Malachi Tamepo
Aiden Evans, Joseph Donaghue, Thomas Fairbrother.

Five new Pages,
Josef Fairbrother, Justine Evans, James Green, Isaac Skilling and Julian Conlon.

Jose and Jerome O’Sullivan, Squires.

Dr Mervin de Lancea and Fr Anthony Mary, F.SS.R.
Knight and Knight Director.

Deo gratias et Mariae!! 

After a moving ceremony we thank God for all His blessings and ask you to keep these young men in your prayers for their perseverance in striving to serve Our Lord and King with fidelity and joy.
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KNIGHTS OF THE EUCHARISTIC HEART OF JESUS...

Posted on Jul 21, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

On the Feast of the Most Holy Redeemer, the third Sunday in July, 19th July 2015, at the Oratory of Our Mother of Perpetual Succour, Emeritus Bishop Basil Meeking, DD, inaugurated the Knights of the Eucharistic Heart of JesusThe Knights of the Eucharistic Heart of Jesus is an organization which has been formed by the Congregation of the Sons of the Most Holy Redeemer. Its object is to provide a solid formation for boys and men who wish to serve Our Blessed Lord at His altar. It has been created in response to the need to train boys and men worthy of the duty of serving at the Traditional Rite of Holy Mass. A society called Knights of the Altar was begun under St John Bosco in 1858, and this name was used in the United States of America by a Fr Benz in 1939, who formed an Altar serving society. Our Society is largely based on the Knights of the Altar.

Why Knights?

Medieval Knighthood, in the service of manor lords, calls forth such ideals as honour, loyalty, justice, chivalry, and respect for all. In the use of the term knight, the Altar Server is reminded of his duty to serve the Lord of lords with fidelity and honour, to treat others with respect and justice, and to live an upright personal life, defending always the rights of God and His Holy Church. In the names page and squire, the server is reminded again of the years of practice and study that went into the training of a knight and should consider with what devotion and perseverance he should attend to his own training in the service of the Altar. The chevalier was a travelling knight, which should remind the server that he should be ever travelling toward his heavenly goal.

Purpose of the Society

(1) To form a worthy guard of honour to our Divine Eucharistic King in whose service we willingly assume the dignity and honour of becoming Knights of the Eucharistic Heart of Jesus;
(2) To render faithful, reverent and edifying service to God by assisting His visible representatives, the Bishops and Priests, in offering the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass and in all other liturgical and devotional functions;
(3) To enkindle in the hearts of the faithful whom we represent at the altar, greater piety and devotion by reverently performing the duties of our holy office and by giving good example in our daily lives;
(4) Finally, to ensure the continued and efficient function of the Knights of the Eucharistic Heart of Jesus as a society by attending meetings and giving of our service to the Church.

Below are photos taken at this memorable ceremony.

Some of the younger altar servers processing to Holy Mass.

Emeritus Bishop Basil Meeking, DD.

Prayers at the foot of the Altar.

Incensation at the beginning of Mass.

The Sanctissimum is removed for a Pontifical Mass at the Faldstool.

Seated for the singing of the Gloria.

Future Knights of the Eucharistic Heart of Jesus.

Bishop Meeking sings the collects; of the Mass
and of his anniversary of ordination to the Priesthood, 62 years today.

The Servers stand attentively at the Service of Jesus Christ the King.

Fr Anthony Mary, F.SS.R. is dubbed the Knight Director.

Seven boys became Apprentices. This is the first step
to becoming a Knight. The apprentice needs to learn all the
Latin responses by heart for Low Mass.

Two of the five Pages who have learnt their Latin response by heart
 and know how to serve Acolyte 2

The Pages receive from the Bishop
the Cassock, Surplice, Medal of the Eucharistic Heart, as well as the Handbook.
The Bishops addresses the pages: “Wear this cassock, in which you are vested, with the greatest respect, for it is part of the armour you shall wear as a Knight of the Eucharistic Heart of Jesus in the service of your Lord and Master Jesus Christ.
May Our Lord clothe you with the grace you need for your new dignity as his servant, just as you will now be clothed in this surplice. May you show yourselves worthy by the proof of your life, and may its whiteness be ever a true symbol of the gleaming purity of your soul.”

Jose and Jerome O’Sullivan became Squires.
They receive the single red tassel for this rank.

Justin Evans and Josef Fairbrother having been received as Pages.

Mervin de Lancea is dubbed a Knight by the Bishop.

A Scottish Broad Sword used for the dubbing.

The elevation of the Precious Blood.

The excellent choir that sang various parts of the Mass in polyphony. 

The new Apprentices, Pages, Squires and Knights.
“We, the Knights of the Eucharistic Heart of Jesus, pledge allegiance to our Lord and Master, Jesus Christ, to His representatives on earth, and to Mary, our Queen Immaculate, whom we will serve faithfully until we attain eternal triumph in heaven. We pledge ourselves to form a worthy guard of honour to our Divine Eucharistic King in whose service we willingly assume the dignity and honour of becoming Knights of the Eucharistic Heart of Jesus; to render faithful, reverent and edifying service to God by assisting His visible representatives, the Bishops and Priests, in offering the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass and in all other liturgical and devotional functions; to enkindle in the hearts of the faithful, whom we represent at the altar, greater piety and devotion by reverently performing the duties of our holy office and by giving good example in our daily lives.”
“Tu es sacerdos in aeternum!”
After the Mass congratulating the Bishop
 for his fidelity and service of 62 years a priest.

Seven new Apprentices
Arlen Dempsey, John Fairborther, Joseph le Grelle, Malachi Tamepo
Aiden Evans, Joseph Donaghue, Thomas Fairbrother.

Five new Pages,
Josef Fairbrother, Justine Evans, James Green, Isaac Skilling and Julian Conlon.

Jose and Jerome O’Sullivan, Squires.

Dr Mervin de Lancea and Fr Anthony Mary, F.SS.R.
Knight and Knight Director.

Deo gratias et Mariae!! 

After a moving ceremony we thank God for all His blessings and ask you to keep these young men in your prayers for their perseverance in striving to serve Our Lord and King with fidelity and joy.
Read More

Making Good Choices...

Posted on Jul 21, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Fearing that he might not resist the temptations commonly experienced by lawyers, Fidelis of Sigmaringen (1578–1622) became a Capuchin priest, a noted preacher, and a martyr.

Each of us will die eventually. “What kind of conscience will I bring to that moment?” should be our main concern.

“By faith, the martyrs gave their lives, bearing witness to the truth of the Gospel that had transformed them and made them capable of attaining to the greatest gift of love: the forgiveness of their persecutors,” writes Pope Benedict XVI in Door of Faith, his apostolic letter about the current Year of Faith.

Fidelis preached in Feldkirch, Germany, nursed soldiers felled by an epidemic, and in 1622 was named by the Holy See’s new Congregation for the Propagation of the Faith to lead a group of preachers in Switzerland. Because he had some success there, Calvinists in Seewis killed Fidelis while he was preaching. He is a patron of lawyers and that congregation’s first missionary martyr. As he was about to die, Fidelis did not regret his choice to join the Franciscan family as a Capuchin.

Our daily choices matter because they reaffirm what St. Paul described as our “old self” or a “new self” (Col 3:9–11). May our choices reflect our Baptism into Jesus’ suffering, death, and resurrection!

This post is from the “Dear Reader” column of St. Anthony Messenger. To subscribe to this award-winning publication, go here.

*****
Photo: Krivosheev Vitaly/Shutterstock

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"And now let us begin this journey, the Bishop and people, this journey of the Church of Rome, which presides in charity over all the Churches, a journey of brotherhood in love, of mutual trust. Let us always pray for one another. Let us pray for the whole world that there might be a great sense of brotherhood.

I will now give my blessing to you and to the whole world, to all men and women of good will."

-Papa Francis quote

He does not know you, yet he prays for you.
He will most likely never meet you, yet he loves you.

This is your chance to show your love, for as the Bible teaches, "Whosoever therefore shall confess me before men, him will I confess also before my Father which is in heaven. But whosoever shall deny me before men, him will I also deny before my Father which is in heaven."