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Papa Francis The First | His Holiness Papa Francisco

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Just reminding erryone of my current location #rio #papafrancis #skyline #beautiful

Posted by on 7-22-13

El Jueves salgo para Puerto Rico y estare participando del JMJ en PR. Un Evento unido al JMJ de Brasil. Seran dias de mucha gracia, poder y misericordia. Contamos con sus oraciones! Para mas info porfavor visiten www.jmj2013pr.com #jmj #jmj2013pr #brasil #puertorico #unasolaiglesia #jovenes #catholic #catolico #papafrancis

Posted by on 7-22-13

“Não tenho ouro nem prata.. Vim aqui transmitir o maior presente que recebi nessa vida: Jesus Cristo” – Papa Francisco, no Palácio Guanabara, na sua chegada no Rio de Janeiro

Posted by on 7-22-13

Nada mejor que coger cosas de los hoteles y encontrartelas un tiempo mas tarde #recuerdoson #abril2013 #antequera #campeonatoespañaporescuelas #catalunya #buenequipo #genialrelevo #granada #bocadecaballo #dientesdeleon #mojopicon #bananas #pasajeros #titofrancis #papafrancis #yayofrancis #quierovolver

Posted by on 7-22-13

El papa Francisco acaba de recitar: “Necesitamos santos sin velo, sin sotana. Necesitamos santos de jeans y zapatillas. Necesitamos santos que vayan al cine, escuchen musica y paseen con sus amigos. Necesitamos santos que coloquen a Dios en primer lugar y que sobresalgan en la Universidad. Necesitamos santos que busquen tiempo cada dia para rezar y que sepan enamorar en la pureza y castidad, o que consagren su castidad. Necesitamos santos modernos, santos del siglo XXI con una espiritualidad insertada en nuestro tiempo. Necesitamos santos comprometidos con los pobres y los necesarios cambios sociales. Necesitamos santos que vivan en el mundo, se santifiquen en el mundo y que no tengan miedo de vivir en el mundo. Necesitamos santos que tomen Coca Cola y coman hot-dogs, que sean internautas, que escuchen iPod. Necesitamos santos que amen la Eucaristia y que no tengan vergüenza de tomar una cerveza o comer pizza el fin de semana con los amigos. Necesitamos santos a los que les guste el cine, el teatro, la musica, la danza, el deporte. Necesitamos santos sociables, abiertos, normales, amigos, alegres, compañeros. Necesitamos santos que esten en el mundo y que sepan saborear las cosas puras y buenas del mundo, pero sin ser mundanos”. Amen!!!!!!! (Esta parte la dije yo) :) #santidadenjeans #santidad #PapaFrancis #Iglesia #yes #holiness

Posted by on 7-21-13

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Did Pope Francis predict his own death?...

Posted on Aug 19, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

During the presser on the airplane returning from Korea, the Pope spoke of the role, rather the “institution” of Pope Emeritus.  He also spoke of his own death.

Keep in mind that some time ago I predicted that Pope Francis, now 77, would resign when he reaches 80 years old.  And before any of you go running around declaring that I want him to resign, please note that I simply think that that is what he will do.

I, frankly, am not pleased about this Pope Emeritus thing.  I greatly respect Benedict XVI.  I think I understand why he abdicated, but I can’t say I am happy about it, for various reasons I need not go into here.

Let’s have look at some things the Holy Father Pope Francis said on the airplane.  HERE 

First, the Pope Emeritus stuff.  It’s a little disjointed, but you can get what he is driving at:

German journalist from KNA:

What type of relationship is there between you and Benedict XVI? Is there an habitual exchange of opinions and ideas? Is there a common project after this encyclical?

Pope Francis:

We see each other. Before leaving I went to see him. He, two weeks prior, had sent me an interesting text and he asked me an opinion. We have a normal relationship because I go back to this idea and maybe a theologian doesn’t like it. But, I think that the pope emeritus is not an exception. After so many centuries, he’s [Benedict's] the first emeritus and let’s think that if i am aged and don’t have the strength, but it was a beautiful gesture of nobility and also humility and courage. But, I think that 70 years ago also the bishops emeritus were an exception. They didn’t exist. Today, the bishops emeritus are an institution. [NB] I think that the pope emeritus is already an institution. Why? Our lives are getting longer and at a certain age there is not the capacity to govern well, because the body tires and health perhaps is good but there is the capacity to carry forward all of the problems like those in the governance of the church. I think that Pope Benedict made this gesture of popes emeritus. I repeat that maybe some theologian would say this isn’t just, but i think like this. The centuries will tell if it’s like this or not, we’ll see, but if you can to say to me, ‘but do you think that one day if you don’t feel like it, will you go on?’ But, I would do the same. I would do the same. I will pray, but I would do the same. He opened a door that is institutional not exceptional.

[...]

Pretty clear.

On the other hand, when answering a question about how he handle’s his popularity…

French journalist Anais Martin, French Radio:

In Rio, when the crowd yelled “Francesco, Francesco!” you responded “Cristo, Cristo!” Today, how do you manage this immense popularity? How do you live it?

Pope Francis:

I don’t know how to tell you. I live it thanking the Lord that his people are happy. I really do that, hoping the best for the people of God. I live it as generosity towards the people. On the inside, I try to think of my sins and my errors not to flatter myself because I know it won’t last long. Two or three years and then (makes a sound and gesture) up to the house of the of the Father.

[...]

I have the sense that His Holiness doesn’t think he will be Pope after another 3 years or so, that he will either have died or he will be in bad enough shape that he will resign.

Please pray for His Holiness daily.

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Prayers for Pope Francis’ family...

Posted on Aug 19, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

I recommend prayers for the Holy Father and members of his family.  Some of the Holy Father’s relatives were killed in an auto accident in Argentina.

According to police reports, the car was being driven by the pope’s nephew, 38-year-old Emanuel Bergoglio, when it slammed into the back of a truck at 12:30 a.m.  The family had been returning from a holiday weekend when the accident occurred.  Killed in the crash were the wife and two children, two-year-old Antonio and eight-month-old Jose Bergoglio.  The pope’s nephew remains hospitalized in serious condition.

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Did Pope Francis really endorse airstrikes?...

Posted on Aug 19, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

If you want to, you can read the full transcript of Pope Francis’ presser on the airplane as he returned to Rome from Korea. HERE

The issue of Iraq came up. American journalist Alan Holdren (Catholic News Agency/ACI PRENSA/EWTN): asked His Holiness about airstrikes.

Q: As you know, not long ago the U.S. military forces have started bombing terrorists in Iraq to prevent a genocide. To protect the future of the minorities, I think also of the Catholics under your guidance, do you approve of this American bombing (campaign)?

Pope Francis:

Thanks for such a clear question. In these cases where the is an unjust aggression, I can only say that it is licit to stop the unjust aggressor. I underscore the verb “stop.” I don’t saying to bomb or make war, (but) stop it. The means with which it can be stopped should be evaluated. To stop the unjust aggressor is licit. But we also have to have memory, as well, eh. How many times under this excuse of stopping the unjust aggressor the powers have taken control of nations. And, they have made a true war of conquest. One single nation cannot judge how you stop this, how you stop an unjust aggressor. After the Second World War, there was the idea of the United Nations. It must be discussed there and said ‘there’s an unjust aggressor, it seems so “How do we stop it?” Only that, nothing more. Secondly, the minorities. Thanks for the word because they speak to me of the Christians, poor Christians – it is true, they suffer – and the martyrs – and yes, there are so many martyrs – but here there are men and women, religious minorities, and not all Christian and all are equal before God, no? Stopping the unjust aggressor is a right that humanity has but it is also a right of the aggressor to be stopped so he doesn’t do evil.

As I watch the news today, some claims are being made that Pope Francis “approves” of airstrikes.

This is what I initially heard.  My first reaction to his repetition of “stop”, was probably influence by my firearms training: you “stop” an aggressor.  You do not have the intention to kill but to stop the aggressor from doing harm.   In that light, I, too, thought for a moment that he was endorsing the use of military force.

Then I woke up.

Notice how he dodges to the “United Nations” solution.  Also, that phrase about an “excuse” to take control of nations.  That sounds to me to be more of a slam of these USA and Iraq than it is of Russia and Ukraine.

And what to make of that comment about the United Nations?

“After the Second World War, there was the idea of the United Nations. It must be discussed there and said ‘there’s an unjust aggressor, it seems so “How do we stop it?” Only that, nothing more.

I could be wrong, but that sounds very much like, “We have to talk to each other for a while and then, after talking, we all can go to the unjust aggressor to talk about stopping, but we can’t do more than talk.  We can’t use military force to ‘stop’ an unjust aggressor.”

Did I get that wrong?  The Pope’s answer is ambiguous, but I think that was the message.

At this point I track back to what I posted the other day, HERE, from a Pope who grew up in war ravaged Europe, liberated by allies who defeated an unjust regime:

8. Here I wish to express gratitude to the international organizations and to all those who are daily engaged in the application of international humanitarian law. Nor can I fail to mention the many soldiers engaged in the delicate work of resolving conflicts and restoring the necessary conditions for peace. I wish to remind them of the words of the Second Vatican Council: ”All those who enter the military in service to their country should look upon themselves as guardians of the security and freedom of their fellow-countrymen, and, in carrying out this duty properly, they too contribute to the establishment of peace”.

 

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At Home with Francis...

Posted on Aug 19, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

I have been privileged to work many long years at Franciscan Media. Few of us get the chance to do work we love while providing for our families—fewer still have life-altering, world-changing work.

Of course, as with any workplace, there are inconveniences. A jammed copier, too many meetings, an abundance of work and a shortage of time: Most office workers can relate. But on that rare occasion when I wonder if I’m really in the right place, I have a few sure-fire tricks to help me orient myself again:

1. I talk to a friar. It doesn’t take long to find one roaming the hallways, often on his way out to feed the hungry or back from saying Mass. These men are an inspiration.

2. I spend a few minutes with coworkers. These folks share the daily frustrations, but also the larger sense of mission and purpose. They remind me that jammed copiers are everywhere, but Jesus isn’t invited into too many boardrooms.

3. I visit the church. Our offices are located next to the friary and its beautiful church. Each morning when I come to work there are a few people still sleeping in one of the doorways. Each day I walk around the corner at lunchtime, there are a few others gathered there for shade and companionship. If these, the least of our brothers, can find a home at Franciscan Media, I think maybe I can, too.

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Jerusalem’s ‘Via Crucis’...

Posted on Aug 18, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

Every Friday afternoon at 3 p.m., several Friars Minor and many pilgrims assemble in the courtyard of a Muslim school in Jerusalem’s Old City to begin the Stations of the Cross. That school is built on the probable site of the Fortress Antonia, where Pontius Pilate condemned Jesus to death, and near the Dome of the Rock mosque.

Across the street from the school is the Studium Biblicum Franciscanum, a graduate school founded in 1924 for Scripture study. It contains a chapel for the second station (Jesus accepts his cross). Seven other stations are commemorated along the Via Dolorosa (Sorrowful Way) until the group reaches the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, where the last five stations are celebrated.

In the year 400, the pilgrim Hegeria reported that she had participated in a procession in Jerusalem to commemorate Jesus’ passage to Calvary. The number of stations varied over the years until 1731 when Pope Clement XII fixed it at 14, allowing all churches to have them. Since the days of Ottoman rule, a kawas (official hired by the Christians) has accompanied the pilgrims. The friars use a portable loudspeaker for outdoor stations. Franciscans have promoted the Stations of the Cross devotion around the world.

This blog was taken from Pat McCloskey’s “Dear Reader” column in St. Anthony Messenger. To subscribe to this award-winning publication, click here.

*****
Photo: Dmitry Sunagatov/PhotoXpress

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Jerusalem’s ‘Via Crucis’...

Posted on Aug 18, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

Every Friday afternoon at 3 p.m., several Friars Minor and many pilgrims assemble in the courtyard of a Muslim school in Jerusalem’s Old City to begin the Stations of the Cross. That school is built on the probable site of the Fortress Antonia, where Pontius Pilate condemned Jesus to death, and near the Dome of the Rock mosque.

Across the street from the school is the Studium Biblicum Franciscanum, a graduate school founded in 1924 for Scripture study. It contains a chapel for the second station (Jesus accepts his cross). Seven other stations are commemorated along the Via Dolorosa (Sorrowful Way) until the group reaches the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, where the last five stations are celebrated.

In the year 400, the pilgrim Hegeria reported that she had participated in a procession in Jerusalem to commemorate Jesus’ passage to Calvary. The number of stations varied over the years until 1731 when Pope Clement XII fixed it at 14, allowing all churches to have them. Since the days of Ottoman rule, a kawas (official hired by the Christians) has accompanied the pilgrims. The friars use a portable loudspeaker for outdoor stations. Franciscans have promoted the Stations of the Cross devotion around the world.

This blog was taken from Pat McCloskey’s “Dear Reader” column in St. Anthony Messenger. To subscribe to this award-winning publication, click here.

*****
Photo: Dmitry Sunagatov/PhotoXpress

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1500 Christians and Yazidi forced into “sexu...

Posted on Aug 16, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

13 August 2014 – Two senior United Nations officials today condemned in the strongest terms the “barbaric acts” of sexual violence and “savage rapes” the armed group Islamic State (IS) has perpetrated on minorities in areas under its control.

In a joint statement from Baghdad, the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence (SRSG) in Conflict, Zainab Hawa Bangura and the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Iraq, Nickolay Mladenov urged the immediate protection of civilians.

“We are gravely concerned by continued reports of acts of violence, including sexual violence against women and teenage girls and boys belonging to Iraqi minorities …
“Atrocious accounts of abduction and detention of Yazidi, Christian, as well as Turkomen and Shabak women, girls and boys, and reports of savage rapes, are reaching us in an alarming manner,” Ms. Bangura and Mr. Mladenov stated, pointing out that some 1,500 Yazidi and Christian persons may have been forced into sexual slavery.

The officials condemned, in the strongest terms, the explicit targeting of women and children and the barbaric acts IS has perpetrated on minorities. Acts of sexual violence are grave human rights violations that can be considered as war crimes and crimes against humanity, they warned.

Mr. Mladenov called on regional Governments and the wider international community for the immediate release of the women and girls held in captivity and to support the Government of Iraq’s efforts to protect its citizens. He pledged that his Office would closely monitor the situation to ensure accountability and advocate for support to the survivors of the “barbaric acts.”

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1500 Christians and Yazidi forced into “sexu...

Posted on Aug 16, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

13 August 2014 – Two senior United Nations officials today condemned in the strongest terms the “barbaric acts” of sexual violence and “savage rapes” the armed group Islamic State (IS) has perpetrated on minorities in areas under its control.

In a joint statement from Baghdad, the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence (SRSG) in Conflict, Zainab Hawa Bangura and the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Iraq, Nickolay Mladenov urged the immediate protection of civilians.

“We are gravely concerned by continued reports of acts of violence, including sexual violence against women and teenage girls and boys belonging to Iraqi minorities …
“Atrocious accounts of abduction and detention of Yazidi, Christian, as well as Turkomen and Shabak women, girls and boys, and reports of savage rapes, are reaching us in an alarming manner,” Ms. Bangura and Mr. Mladenov stated, pointing out that some 1,500 Yazidi and Christian persons may have been forced into sexual slavery.

The officials condemned, in the strongest terms, the explicit targeting of women and children and the barbaric acts IS has perpetrated on minorities. Acts of sexual violence are grave human rights violations that can be considered as war crimes and crimes against humanity, they warned.

Mr. Mladenov called on regional Governments and the wider international community for the immediate release of the women and girls held in captivity and to support the Government of Iraq’s efforts to protect its citizens. He pledged that his Office would closely monitor the situation to ensure accountability and advocate for support to the survivors of the “barbaric acts.”

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Pope Francis tells NBC reporter he intends to visi...

Posted on Aug 14, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

While the Holy Father’s possible visit to Philadelphia for a congress on the family has been hedged about with cautious language, today we have greater clarity about what Francis wants.  From NBC:

Pope Francis Tells NBC News He’ll Pay Philadelphia a Visit

Pope Francis told NBC News he will be paying a visit to the city of brotherly love. NBC’s Anne Thompson spoke to the pope in Italian as the pontiff flew to Asia for his first-ever trip. [... to Asia, that is.] Thompson asked, in Italian, if the pope would travel to Philadelphia at any point.

“Si,” replied Francis, going on to mentioned the city’s World Family Day, due to take place in September 2015. The Vatican typically does not announce Papal Trips more than six months in advance. Past remarks made by the pope about travel plans, however, have proved to play out. The pontiff said in July 2013 that he wanted to go to Asia – which is exactly where he landed on Thursday. The pope is visiting Seoul for five days and has upcoming plans to travel to Sri Lanka and the Philippines.

The pope traveled to Seoul with around 65 journalists, greeting each one personally as they climbed aboard Alitalia Flight 4000. While the pope set separately, Thompson and her fellow journalists enjoyed a hearty meal of cannelloni with mint-scented ricotta and filet of beef. [But... what about los pobres?]

While Philadelphia may play up its name as the city of brotherly love when the pope travels there, the pontiff’s arrival in Asia on Thursday wasn’t met warmly all around. North Korea – which has a long history of making sure it is not forgotten during high-profile events in the South – fired five rockets into the sea as Francis arrived in Seoul. [Ho hum.] In his first speech of the trip, Pope Francis urged renewed efforts to forge peace on the war-divided Korean Peninsula and for both sides to avoid “fruitless” criticisms and shows of force.

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The Power of Gratitude...

Posted on Aug 14, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

Some days things just seem to be out of sync — disappointing news, difficulties with family or colleagues, feelings of sluggishness or exhaustion. Sometimes there’s a stretch of days like this. My week started out this way, and I soon had a little litany of misery, small and not-so-small frustrations piling up.

But then, an old friend posted a picture from our childhood on Facebook, and it cheered me up. A colleague offered support and advice just when I needed it most. Later, new neighbors paid us a spontaneous visit, bringing a plate of delicious baklava from Turkey. As the day ended, I felt uplifted — and grateful.

Gratitude doesn’t make the problems and challenges disappear; its power lies in transforming our attitudes and reactions, allowing us to experience the blessings that come our way — blessings we all too often miss when we focus on the problems or wallow in self-pity.

Here’s to the power of gratitude!

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The Power of Gratitude...

Posted on Aug 14, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

Some days things just seem to be out of sync — disappointing news, difficulties with family or colleagues, feelings of sluggishness or exhaustion. Sometimes there’s a stretch of days like this. My week started out this way, and I soon had a little litany of misery, small and not-so-small frustrations piling up.

But then, an old friend posted a picture from our childhood on Facebook, and it cheered me up. A colleague offered support and advice just when I needed it most. Later, new neighbors paid us a spontaneous visit, bringing a plate of delicious baklava from Turkey. As the day ended, I felt uplifted — and grateful.

Gratitude doesn’t make the problems and challenges disappear; its power lies in transforming our attitudes and reactions, allowing us to experience the blessings that come our way — blessings we all too often miss when we focus on the problems or wallow in self-pity.

Here’s to the power of gratitude!

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Prayer Warrior...

Posted on Aug 13, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

On August 27 we celebrate the feast day of St. Monica. I can identify with her because she’s a mom who obviously cared about the eternal souls of those people around her whom she loved. She spent her entire life praying for others and it paid off. I mean, it doesn’t get much better than knowing that your husband, mother-in-law and son (St. Augustine) are all living their lives for God because of your prayers and persistence.

My oldest is now twenty-two years old and she’s practically living on her own. At first I felt like my job as mother was over, but now I realize that’s it’s far from complete. My job will always be to pray for her as she journeys through life. I believe that my main job right now is to be a prayer warrior.

With all the challenges our kids face academically and socially, praying for our children should be our main priority. It’s tough trying to raise our kids as Christians when so much around them tells them to act and behave otherwise. And so I will look to the example of Saint Monica and try to be the prayer warrior that my family needs.

*****

Image courtesy of nuchylee at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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The Beauty of Silence...

Posted on Aug 12, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

Last night as I laid in the yard looking up at the night sky, I saw a shooting star streak straight over head.  Its not the first time I have seen one, in fact the reason I went outside to begin with was to look at them.  It is that time of the year again for the annual return of the Perseids meteor shower.

This time each year, the Earth passes through the debris field of the Swift- Tuttle comet giving us an amazing light show in the night sky.  Some Catholics call this meteor shower “the tears of St. Lawrence” because the dates of the meteor shower coincide each year with the feast day of the saint’s martyrdom (August 10).  Why am I so fascinated with the meteor showers? Because it is a great example of the beauty and power of God’s creation!

Imagine a dust particle about 1 cm in diameter, entering the Earth’s outer atmosphere traveling at speeds up to 136,000 miles per hour and reaching temperatures of 3000 degrees Fahrenheit.  That tiny particle glows so bright as it evaporates some 60 miles above the earth, that we are able to see it with the naked eye as it flashes across the night sky.

Every year, I try to take time to see these, but this year I realized for the first time that as awesome and powerful these meteor showers are, they go by without a sound.  Then a thought came to mind as I watched: “If I don’t take the time to stop and look up, I would not even know they were there.”

Later in the evening, I had another thought.  Why it popped into my mind?  I don’t know, but it really got me thinking:

If I don’t open my eyes toward the silence of the night sky, I would miss out on an example of the awesome beauty and power of God’s creation.  If I don’t open my heart toward the silence found with inner peace and tranquility, I would miss out on the awesome beauty and power of God’s love.

***God Bless***

 

featured image: suphakit73/ freedigitalphotos.net

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While world leaders and newspapers keep guilty sil...

Posted on Aug 7, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

We are helpless to come to the assistance of our brethren in Iraq except by our prayers.
Of your charity read this letter from the Patriarch and carry them in your hearts to God.
They carry the Holy Cross and follow the Lamb to slaughter; 
Agnus redemit oves ~ the Lamb redeems the sheep;
the innocent Eastern Christians die 
for their guilty Western brethren;
with our rosaries let us wait beside them in their passion;
to pray for their perseverance.
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Treasuring the Mass...

Posted on Aug 7, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

Today’s guest blogger is Nick Luken, a second-year student at The Ohio State University, majoring in English and minoring in professional writing. Nick graduated from Roger Bacon, a Franciscan high school in Cincinnati, in 2012.

One of the best things my family has taught me is the importance of going to Mass. Ever since before I could remember, my parents took my siblings and me to Mass every single weekend. The few times other obligations came up on Saturday evenings, we’d go to Mass on Sunday morning. Seeing my parents make such an effort to get us all to Mass each week branded their lesson onto the core of my being: every weekend, go to Mass.

Until recently, their lesson had worked so well that I had only missed Mass three times. The first time, I had broken my arm only a couple days earlier and was still shaken up from surgery. The second time, I was on a Boy Scout outing and had no way to get to Mass. The third time, I had just moved into my dorm at Ohio State, and I had no idea where any local Catholic churches were yet. Each of these times I missed Mass, I felt ashamed, but I usually got over my guilt somehow or another. I thought it was a big deal to miss Mass, but not necessarily something to stress over.

A couple weeks ago, though, I missed Mass because of another Boy Scout trip. We were in the Lake Placid area, and on a tight schedule, so I really didn’t have time to get to Mass at all. But this time was very different from the first three. I felt pretty miserable most of our first night in camp, and every so often I found myself thinking that going to Mass would have helped me immensely. It would’ve brought joy to my heart and convinced me that feeling stressed about travel and mistakes was silly compared to the glory of God.

I think that a lot of times we forget just how wonderful Mass is. I know I kind of did until I missed Mass that Sunday a few weeks ago. A lot of people I know hardly go to Mass at all. As Catholics, we should cherish our ability to go to Mass. After all, how many places are there in this world where you can receive the body and blood of Christ? I pray that all of us might always see the beauty of the Mass and never take it for granted.

Photo: CNS/Paul Haring

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"And now let us begin this journey, the Bishop and people, this journey of the Church of Rome, which presides in charity over all the Churches, a journey of brotherhood in love, of mutual trust. Let us always pray for one another. Let us pray for the whole world that there might be a great sense of brotherhood.

I will now give my blessing to you and to the whole world, to all men and women of good will."

-Papa Francis quote

He does not know you, yet he prays for you.
He will most likely never meet you, yet he loves you.

This is your chance to show your love, for as the Bible teaches, "Whosoever therefore shall confess me before men, him will I confess also before my Father which is in heaven. But whosoever shall deny me before men, him will I also deny before my Father which is in heaven."