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Canonist Ed Peters on the changes to law for marri...

Posted on Sep 9, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

You will want to have at least a glance at largifical canonist Ed Peters take on the changes to Canon Law for the Latin and the Eastern Churches concerning the procedure for handling marriage cases which were announced yesterday.

A first look at Mitis Iudex

He points out the changes, major and minor.

And

A second look at Mitis, especially at the new fast-track annulment process

Toward the end of that post he writes:

Looking ahead

At the pope’s request, a tiny group of experts, most from just one country, developed these new canons and explanations in a very short time. I find, however, the implications of some of these norms for marriage law in general, and for diocesan bishops in particular, stunning, and I join Dr. Kurt Martens of CUA in wondering how bishops must feel at having such significant burdens thrust on them just in time for Christmas with, as far as one can see, virtually no prior consultation. I expressly cautioned against this approach last year and sound that claxon again. Assuming, in any event, that I have read the new norms correctly, and assuming that there are no easy resolutions to my concerns, what might one suggest?

First, and most importantly, the vacatio legis (a delay period before new laws go into effect per Canon 8) indicated for Mitis should be extended from this December until well into next year at the very least. If, as some assert, Francis’ annulment reforms are the most significant in the last three hundred years, a considerably longer period than three months is needed to prepare for them. If necessary, a request for an extension could be proposed by the upcoming Synod of Bishops.

Second, a much wider consultation about annulment reform should be conducted, a consultation that would involve, at a minimum, manyidentified diocesan bishops (identified precisely so observers could forward remarks to them) and canonists from several countries, especially from countries with extensive tribunal operational experience.

I repeat, some aspects of Mitis are sound. The elimination of mandatory appeal, for example, can be put into effect with minimal delay. But other aspects of Mitis, especially the fast-track annulment option, need, I suggest, considerably more study. I only hope sufficient time is accorded the wider Church to make such studies feasible.

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Who Is Pope Francis?...

Posted on Sep 9, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Jorge Mario Bergoglio was born in Buenos Aires on December 17, 1936, to Italian immigrants. Studious throughout his young life, he studied at the University of Buenos Aires, receiving a master’s degree in chemistry. He began his religious training at the Jesuit seminary of Villa Devoto, entering the Society of Jesus in 1958. He attended the Philosophical and Theological Faculty of San Miguel, earning a degree in philosophy and a doctorate in theology in Freiburg, Germany.

Bergoglio’s climb in the Catholic world was relatively swift. He was ordained in 1969 and served as Jesuit provincial from 1973 through 1979. In 1992, he was ordained auxiliary bishop of Buenos Aires. After becoming archbishop of Buenos Aires in 1998, he was named a cardinal three years later.

Four years later, Bergoglio became the president of the bishops’ conference of Argentina—a position he held until 2011. But an even loftier position awaited him.

Introducing Pope Francis

On April 19, 2005, then-Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger secured the required votes to be elected our 265th pope—a job many believe he didn’t want. Bergoglio, the quiet Jesuit, came in second. He still had the confidence of many cardinals in the days that followed Benedict’s resignation in 2013.

On the second day and the fifth ballot, Bergoglio won the two-thirds majority and was elected, taking the name Francis and, with it, the reins of the Catholic Church. He is the first Jesuit pope and the first one from Latin America—home to 40 percent of the world’s Catholics.

From the beginning, Francis avoided papal formalities. He greeted the crowd in a simple cassock, not the ornate, red mozzetta worn by his predecessors. Rather than being elevated on a platform above the cardinals, Francis positioned himself standing with his brothers when he was introduced.

The pope “stands as the figure of unity for all Catholics,” Cardinal Timothy M. Dolan, the president of the US Conference of Catholic Bishops, told Catholic News Service that day.

It’s that gift for unifying that likely got him elected. While conservative on matters of contraception and same sex marriage, Pope Francis, known to have washed the feet of persons with AIDS, leans progressive on issues of poverty and economic progress. The breadth of his principles, many believe, will help him in reaching Catholics—both devoted and disenfranchised.

Pope Francis in America, commemorative

Love Is Our Mission: Pope Francis in America releases October 30. Pre-order today by clicking here: Pope Francis in America

 
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Feature Photo by giulio napolitano / Shutterstock.com

The post Who Is Pope Francis? appeared first on American Catholic Blog.

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The Red Wheelbarrow: An Image to Contemplate...

Posted on Sep 8, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

A brief and simple poem by William Carlos Williams (1883-1963), gives us an unusual image to delight in. I offer here, for your heart’s enjoyment and contemplation, “The Red Wheelbarrow.”

The Red Wheelbarrow

so much depends
upon

a red wheel
barrow

glazed with rain
water

beside the white
chickens

Williams’ poem provides a fresh, simple “word picture,” which the reader can simply enjoy for its own sake without needing to analyze further. Imagine standing in awe before a “red wheelbarrow glazed with rainwater beside the white chickens” and marvel about that wondrous image. I read somewhere that Williams wrote “The Red Wheelbarrow” rather quickly while looking out the window at the precious scene described in his poem.

In this poem, Williams Carlos Williams seems to be telling us that “so much depends upon” our having a sense of wonder as we observe the simple beauties of life and nature, as well as the beauties discovered in art and literature. Some years ago, my Franciscan confreres and I had a Franciscan literature teacher whom we deeply admired. During our seminary college years, this teacher often said, “Great literature does not save the soul; it makes the soul worth saving.”

Williams may have also wanted to say “so much depends upon” our being able to sit down before truth like a child and see the value in something, not because it can be used or manipulated for our selfish gain, but because of what it is in itself—because it has an intrinsic, God-given beauty or value.

What Are Your Thoughts

I first became acquainted with this poem in a literature class at Xavier University in Cincinnati, Ohio, in the early 1960s. For some reason, my memory still holds on to this rare gem. Maybe some of you reading this have thoughts of your own to share regarding the poem. I welcome your comments and insights!

*****

Illustration: Idea go

The post The Red Wheelbarrow: An Image to Contemplate appeared first on American Catholic Blog.

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The Red Wheelbarrow: An Image to Contemplate...

Posted on Sep 8, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

A brief and simple poem by William Carlos Williams (1883-1963), gives us an unusual image to delight in. I offer here, for your heart’s enjoyment and contemplation, “The Red Wheelbarrow.”

The Red Wheelbarrow

so much depends
upon

a red wheel
barrow

glazed with rain
water

beside the white
chickens

Williams’ poem provides a fresh, simple “word picture,” which the reader can simply enjoy for its own sake without needing to analyze further. Imagine standing in awe before a “red wheelbarrow glazed with rainwater beside the white chickens” and marvel about that wondrous image. I read somewhere that Williams wrote “The Red Wheelbarrow” rather quickly while looking out the window at the precious scene described in his poem.

In this poem, Williams Carlos Williams seems to be telling us that “so much depends upon” our having a sense of wonder as we observe the simple beauties of life and nature, as well as the beauties discovered in art and literature. Some years ago, my Franciscan confreres and I had a Franciscan literature teacher whom we deeply admired. During our seminary college years, this teacher often said, “Great literature does not save the soul; it makes the soul worth saving.”

Williams may have also wanted to say “so much depends upon” our being able to sit down before truth like a child and see the value in something, not because it can be used or manipulated for our selfish gain, but because of what it is in itself—because it has an intrinsic, God-given beauty or value.

What Are Your Thoughts

I first became acquainted with this poem in a literature class at Xavier University in Cincinnati, Ohio, in the early 1960s. For some reason, my memory still holds on to this rare gem. Maybe some of you reading this have thoughts of your own to share regarding the poem. I welcome your comments and insights!

*****

Illustration: Idea go

The post The Red Wheelbarrow: An Image to Contemplate appeared first on American Catholic Blog.

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Pope Francis on Motherhood...

Posted on Sep 7, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Our guest blogger today is Sister Joanne Schatzlein, OSF, a frequent contributor to St. Anthony Messenger.

On my way to board a plane in Milwaukee’s airport, I recently noticed a “Lactation Station.” Although this enclosed “container” had a happy face painted on the outside, it seemed a most uninviting place to nurse a baby.

I was reminded that when Pope Francis baptized 33 infants in the Sistine Chapel last January, he departed from his homily to speak directly to the mothers of crying babies: “You mothers give your children milk and even now, if they cry because they are hungry, breastfeed them; don’t worry.” He asked them to remember poor mothers around the world who can’t give food to their children.

In a later homily, given on the feast of Sts. Titus and Timothy, he reflected on how mothers and grandmothers nurtured the faith in these saints. Today, women remain the primary nurturers of faith in us all. Why women? As did Sts. Francis and Clare, Pope Francis acknowledged the extraordinary role of Mary, an ordinary woman who said yes to an angel, gave birth to Jesus, and nurtured this infant at her breast in the lowliest of places where farm animals feed—in a manger.

I recalled the unease some people experience when viewing a 14-thcentury fresco in Greccio of Mary nursing baby Jesus. It is one of the earliest depictions of God’s humanity, an infant dependent on his mother’s milk. Anatomically incorrect, the breast is located on the side of Mary’s neck, allowing her to remain fully dressed. Looking at the “Lactation Station” in Milwaukee’s airport, I wondered how far we have progressed in the 21st century.

Are we not all called to be “mothers” in passing on the faith? Indeed, we are called to nurture faith in each other, especially the poor, not in uninviting “containers,” but openly and without shame.

This blog was taken from St. Anthony Messenger‘s monthly column “The Spirit of Francis.”

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Photo: Ruslan Iefremov/Shutterstock

The post Pope Francis on Motherhood appeared first on American Catholic Blog.

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"And now let us begin this journey, the Bishop and people, this journey of the Church of Rome, which presides in charity over all the Churches, a journey of brotherhood in love, of mutual trust. Let us always pray for one another. Let us pray for the whole world that there might be a great sense of brotherhood.

I will now give my blessing to you and to the whole world, to all men and women of good will."

-Papa Francis quote

He does not know you, yet he prays for you.
He will most likely never meet you, yet he loves you.

This is your chance to show your love, for as the Bible teaches, "Whosoever therefore shall confess me before men, him will I confess also before my Father which is in heaven. But whosoever shall deny me before men, him will I also deny before my Father which is in heaven."