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Grow in Friendship with Christ...

Posted on Aug 25, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Our blog today is an excerpt from The Blessing of Family: Inspiring Words from Pope Francis.

Grow in friendship with Christ by listening to his Word. The Lord speaks to us in the depths of our conscience, he speaks to us through Sacred Scripture, he speaks to us in prayer. Learn to stay before him in silence, to read and meditate on the Bible, especially the Gospels, to converse with him every day in order to feel his presence of friendship and love.

Here I would like to emphasize the beauty of a simple contemplative prayer, accessible to all, great and small, the educated and those with little education. It is the prayer of the Holy Rosary. In the Rosary we turn to the Virgin Mary so that she may guide us to an ever closer union with her Son Jesus, to bring us into conformity with him, to have his sentiments and to behave like him.

Indeed, in the Rosary while we repeat the Hail Mary we meditate on the Mysteries, on the events of Christ’s life, so as to know and love him ever better. The Rosary is an effective means for opening ourselves to God, for it helps us to overcome egotism and to bring peace to hearts, to the family, to society and to the world.

Pope Francis
MESSAGE TO YOUNG LITHUANIANS, 6TH NATIONAL
YOUTH DAY, FROM THE VATICAN
FRIDAY, JUNE 21, 2013

To learn more about this book, click here.

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Photo: CNS/Reuters

 

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Let Us Become Poets of Prayer...

Posted on Aug 24, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Our blog today is an excerpt from The Blessing of Family: Inspiring Words from Pope Francis.

The Gospel comes to meet us with a really moving and encouraging image. It is the image of Simeon and Anna, who are spoken of in the Gospel of Jesus’ childhood, composed by St. Luke. They were certainly elderly, the “old man,” Simeon, and the “prophetess,” Anna, who was 84 years old. This woman did not hide her age. The Gospel says that they awaited the coming of God every day, with great trust, for many years. They truly wanted to see Him that day, to grasp the signs, to understand the origin.

By then, they were also perhaps more resigned to die first. That long wait, however, continued to occupy their whole life, having no commitments more important than this: to await the Lord and pray. So, when Mary and Joseph went to the temple to fulfill the provisions of the Law, Simeon and Anna moved quickly, inspired by the Holy Spirit (cf. Lk 2:27).

The burden of age and waiting disappeared in an instant. They recognized the Child, and discovered new strength, for a new task: to give thanks for and bear witness to this Sign from God. Simeon improvised a beautiful hymn of jubilation (cf. Lk 2:29-32)—in that moment he was a poet—and Anna became the first woman to preach of Jesus: she “spoke of him to all who were looking for the redemption of Jerusalem” (Lk 2:38).

Dear grandparents, dear elderly, let us follow in the footsteps of these extraordinary elders! Let us too become like poets of prayer: let us develop a taste for finding our own words, let us once again grasp those which teach us the Word of God.

To learn more about this book, click here.

*****
Photo: CNS

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Let Us Become Poets of Prayer...

Posted on Aug 24, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Our blog today is an excerpt from The Blessing of Family: Inspiring Words from Pope Francis.

The Gospel comes to meet us with a really moving and encouraging image. It is the image of Simeon and Anna, who are spoken of in the Gospel of Jesus’ childhood, composed by St. Luke. They were certainly elderly, the “old man,” Simeon, and the “prophetess,” Anna, who was 84 years old. This woman did not hide her age. The Gospel says that they awaited the coming of God every day, with great trust, for many years. They truly wanted to see Him that day, to grasp the signs, to understand the origin.

By then, they were also perhaps more resigned to die first. That long wait, however, continued to occupy their whole life, having no commitments more important than this: to await the Lord and pray. So, when Mary and Joseph went to the temple to fulfill the provisions of the Law, Simeon and Anna moved quickly, inspired by the Holy Spirit (cf. Lk 2:27).

The burden of age and waiting disappeared in an instant. They recognized the Child, and discovered new strength, for a new task: to give thanks for and bear witness to this Sign from God. Simeon improvised a beautiful hymn of jubilation (cf. Lk 2:29-32)—in that moment he was a poet—and Anna became the first woman to preach of Jesus: she “spoke of him to all who were looking for the redemption of Jerusalem” (Lk 2:38).

Dear grandparents, dear elderly, let us follow in the footsteps of these extraordinary elders! Let us too become like poets of prayer: let us develop a taste for finding our own words, let us once again grasp those which teach us the Word of God.

To learn more about this book, click here.

*****
Photo: CNS

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Pope Francis attended Mass in St. Peter’s on Fea...

Posted on Aug 22, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

This is rather interesting.

According to ZENIT in Italian, the Holy Father showed up in St. Peter’s Basilica the other morning to pray at the altar and tomb of St. Pius X for his saintly predecessor’s feast. He sat down in a pew and stayed for Mass celebrated by a Monsignor in the Secretariat of State.

I used to say Mass there pretty often, in my day… with the 1962 Missal, too boot. One can dream.

Anyway, it seems he may even have received Communion at that Mass, as well. He had already said Mass that day. He told the priest after that he is devoted to St. Pius X.

Would that the Holy Father and the SSPX would, through the intercession of St. Pius and through the help of their Guardian Angels, come to a reconciliation.

Here is the Italian:

Messa in Vaticano per San Pio X. Mescolato tra i fedeli c’è anche il Papa
Francesco già dal mattino all’altare dedicato al Papa trevigiano per pregare. È quindi rimasto per la funzione celebrata da mons. Lucio Bonora, della Segreteria di Stato, tra lo stupore di fedeli e celebranti
Di Redazione
Città del Vaticano, 22 Agosto 2015 (ZENIT.org)
Hanno ricevuto una sorpresa speciale i fedeli che ieri mattina hanno preso parte alla celebrazione eucaristica all’altare di San Pio X, nella Basilica di San Pietro, in occasione della festa del Pontefice trevigiano. Seduto tra i banchi, alla Messa presieduta da mons. Lucio Bonora, impiegato in Segreteria di Stato, c’era infatti Papa Francesco, già lì dalle prime ore del mattino all’altare per una preghiera privata.
Quando è iniziata la funzione il Santo Padre si è quindi fermato per prendervi parte, ricevendo l’abbraccio di pace e la comunione da mons. Bonora, dopo essersi messo in fila tra i fedeli che si accostavano all’Eucaristia. Ai fedeli che intanto erano accorsi in gran numero alla Cappella, il celebrante ha chiesto di affidare a San Pio X tutte le necessità delle proprie famiglie e della Chiesa, non dimenticando di pregare per l’attuale Pontefice.
Bergoglio stesso, al termine della celebrazione ha confidato a Bonora di aver pregato in modo particolare per i catechisti, visto che, in Argentina, San Pio X, è conosciuto come il “Papa del catechismo”, il patrono di tutti i catechisti. Quando Bergoglio era arcivescovo di Buenos Aires, infatti, ci teneva ad incontrare i catechisti della diocesi nella festa di Pio X. Al termine della celebrazione mons. Bonora ha ringraziato di cuore Papa Francesco, il quale gli ha detto: “Ero venuto per una preghiera mia, perché avevo già celebrato la Messa presto, ma poi ti ho visto che venivi all’altare a celebrare, e allora mi sono fermato… Te l’avevo detto che sono devoto di San Pio X”.

L’Osservatore Romano has it also HERE

15_08_22_Francis_PiusX

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Leaving all for Chirst...

Posted on Aug 22, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Today the of the Sons of the Most Holy Redeemer received a new member into its ranks.
The postulant kneels and is questioned by the Superior regarding his desire to enter our Congregation.
The brethren chant the Veni Creator Spiritus while the postulant is covered with the Funeral Pall.
He is clothed in the Religious Habit:
Son, put on Our Lord Jesus Christ, always surrounding thy body with His mortification. 
  
 Kneeling he receives the crucifix:
Receive, my Son, the image of the crucifix, image of thy Master and Redeemer, who suffered for thee and offered Himself for thee. Place it as a seal upon thy heart, as a seal upon thy arm.
 Our Lady’s Rosary is placed in his hands:
Receive, Son, the Rosary of the Blessed Virgin Mary, may She always be a wall to protect thee, a mother to nourish thee, a star to guide thee and the door to thy salvation…
 
 Do Thou, however, learnest diligently to love and imitate Mary, and to propagate Her most salutary devotion everywhere. In dangers, in anguishes, in doubtful things, think of Mary, call upon Mary. May Her sweet name not disappear from thy lips, nor disappear from thy heart.
He is clothed with Our Lady’s Scapular:
Put you on the armour of God, that you may be able to stand against the deceits of the devil. For our wrestling is not against flesh and blood; but against principalities and power, against the rulers of the world of this darkness, against the spirits of wickedness in the high places.
 And finaly, a new name.
Welcome to our Congregation Br Jerome!
 Br Jerome’s mother and father came from America to be with him.
As did his Godmother.
 
 The community on Papa Stronsay.


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Leaving all for Chirst...

Posted on Aug 22, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Today the of the Sons of the Most Holy Redeemer received a new member into its ranks.
The postulant kneels and is questioned by the Superior regarding his desire to enter our Congregation.
The brethren chant the Veni Creator Spiritus while the postulant is covered with the Funeral Pall.
He is clothed in the Religious Habit:
Son, put on Our Lord Jesus Christ, always surrounding thy body with His mortification. 
  
 Kneeling he receives the crucifix:
Receive, my Son, the image of the crucifix, image of thy Master and Redeemer, who suffered for thee and offered Himself for thee. Place it as a seal upon thy heart, as a seal upon thy arm.
 Our Lady’s Rosary is placed in his hands:
Receive, Son, the Rosary of the Blessed Virgin Mary, may She always be a wall to protect thee, a mother to nourish thee, a star to guide thee and the door to thy salvation…
 
 Do Thou, however, learnest diligently to love and imitate Mary, and to propagate Her most salutary devotion everywhere. In dangers, in anguishes, in doubtful things, think of Mary, call upon Mary. May Her sweet name not disappear from thy lips, nor disappear from thy heart.
He is clothed with Our Lady’s Scapular:
Put you on the armour of God, that you may be able to stand against the deceits of the devil. For our wrestling is not against flesh and blood; but against principalities and power, against the rulers of the world of this darkness, against the spirits of wickedness in the high places.
 And finaly, a new name.
Welcome to our Congregation Br Jerome!
 Br Jerome’s mother and father came from America to be with him.
As did his Godmother.
 
 The community on Papa Stronsay.


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#ChimeTravelers: Faith Meets Fiction!...

Posted on Aug 21, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Lisa Hendey, award-winning blogger and founder/editor of Catholic Mom, just published the first two books in a series called Chime Travelers—and they’re starting to make waves among young Catholic readers! Here’s a brief description of both titles.

The Secret of the Shamrock
When Patrick has to work on his church’s cleaning team on a Saturday, he thinks his weekend fun is ruined. But when the old church bells start chiming, Patrick and his pet frog, Francis, are suddenly taken back through time to ancient Ireland. Will the strange shepherd he meets be able to help him get home, or will Patrick be stuck taking care of sheep in the rain and mud forever? Find out in The Secret of the Shamrock.

The Sign of the Carved Cross
Katie joins her friends in being mean to the new girl, Lily. But suddenly, Katie becomes the new girl—in 1675! She has no idea how she traveled in time to a Native American village, but she’s hoping the young woman she meets will be nicer to her than Katie was to Lily. Tekakwitha is a quiet girl with scars on her face from a terrible disease. Tekakwitha’s family doesn’t accept her because of her faith, and soon she and Katie have to run away in the middle of the night. Will Katie ever find her way back home? Find out in The Sign of the Carved Cross.

More adventures are on the way!
Join Patrick as he finds himself in Assisi and meets a young man who left a life of wealth and power to live a life of poverty and simplicity. Find out what it means to rebuild the Church as you get to know St. Francis in book three of the Chime Travelers series.

Katie finds herself on a daring escape through the streets of Assisi with a young woman who is running away from home to give her whole life in service to the poor out of her love for Jesus. Meet St. Clare in the fourth book of the Chime Travelers series.

Click here for more information!

*****
Photo: Susan Hines-Brigger

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Does Pope Francis strike you as being easily scare...

Posted on Aug 20, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

I saw this at The Telegraph:

Donald Trump to the Pope: ‘Isil wants to get you’

Donald Trump says he would not allow the Pope to criticise capitalism if they were to meet face to face, and would scare him into silence by reminding him that violent jihadis of the Islamic State want to invade the Vatican.
[…]
In an interview with CNN on Wednesday night, he was asked about the forthcoming US visit of Pope Francis, who has repeatedly said that capitalism was responsible for many of the world’s problems.
Mr Trump, who described himself as a Protestant, said he would like to meet the Pope but he would not stand for any comments that capitalism was toxic or evil.
“I’d say, ‘Isil wants to get you,’” he said “You know that Isis wants to go in and take over the Vatican….
I’m gonna have to scare the Pope because it’s the only thing.
“The Pope, I hope, can only be scared by God. But the truth is – you know, if you look at what’s going on – they better hope that capitalism works, because it’s the only thing we have right now.
“And it’s a great thing when it works properly.”

[…]

I imagine that there would be a backlash were the Pope to be killed by Islamic extremists.  But how extensive, how strong, would it be… I wonder.

BTW… Trump is certainly right.  ISIL surely would do as much damage as possible to Rome and Vatican City, if given a fraction of a chance.

Does Pope Francis strike you as someone who would be easily scared by the idea of being killed by Islamic extremists?  It’s not as it hasn’t occurred to him already.

Moderation queue is ON.

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You are the periphery which can revitalize the Chu...

Posted on Aug 20, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Some time ago, I wrote HERE:

If there is a malaise in the Church today, if there is an interior decay (and there is), then [as Pope Francis says] we should look to peripheries for that which can help to revitalize our identity, get us strong and healthy again.  We need what the periphery has to offer.

Traditional Catholics whose “legitimate aspirations” have been drawn to the traditional forms of our sacred liturgical worship, and who stick closely to traditional expressions of doctrine, are a periphery.   They have even been made into a periphery by the Church’s own appointed pastors.

It’s time to start listening to this periphery.

I drive at this point in some other posts as well.

I read at One Peter Five an interview of Bp. Athanasius Schneider with the Spanish-Language website, Adelante La Fe (Advance the Faith).  In the interview we find this:

Adelante la Fe: Can Your Excellence give some words of encouragement to those priests who, for being faithful to Church Tradition, are isolated and pushed into the background in their dioceses and not given temples where they can officiate Holy Mass in the Extraordinary Form, as well as to those faithful who are deprived of Traditional Holy Mass?

Mons. Schneider: I would like to say to these priests, seminarians, young people and families: “It is an honor and a privilege to be faithful to the Divine truth and to the spiritual and liturgical traditions of our forefathers and of the saints and being therefore marginalized by those who currently occupy administrative power in the Church. This your fidelity and courage constitute the real power in the Church. You are the real ecclesiastical periphery, which with God’s power renews the Church. Living the true tradition of dogma, liturgy and holiness is a manifestation of the democracy of the Saints, because tradition is the democracy of the Saints. With Saint Athanasius I would like to tell you these words: Those in the Church who oppose, humiliate and marginalize you, have occupied the churches, while during this time you are outside; it is a fact that they have the premises – but you have the Apostolic Faith. They claim that they represent the Church, but in reality, they are the ones who are expelling themselves from it and going astray (cf. Letter to his flock)”.

Beautifully expressed.

He is right.

Be the Maquis!

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A Visit to Remember...

Posted on Aug 20, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Earlier this year, our beloved friend from the US bishops’ conference, Mary Ann Walsh, RSM, passed away, a victim of cancer. Sister Mary Ann, the bishops’ media liaison, had produced commemorative books about Pope Benedict and Pope John Paul II over the years. Who would create such a book for Pope Francis’ likely one-and-only visit to the United States? I wondered if our magazine and book teams might be of help.

It turned out that the Vatican publishing house was wondering about the same book idea. When I called our friends at the US bishops’ Catholic News Service (CNS), director Tony Spence was very interested in a collaborative project. We’ve been working out details ever since, poising our team for the rapid work of getting a book full of rich photos and helpful text written, produced, and published immediately after the papal visit.

It will be the official commemorative edition from the papal visit. The photographs, and the basis for the narrative, will come from the talented team at CNS. The St. Anthony Messenger team will do original writing, select photos, and pull it all together into book material. Our Franciscan Media book team, led by Mark Lombard, will take it from
there, ultimately getting 15,000 copies printed by the end of October.

Franciscan Media and the US bishops’ conference will sell the book. We expect an incredible product: CNS will have highly skilled photographers and writers accompanying the Holy Father throughout his visit. Their analysis and reporting will be unparalleled. And, of course, we ourselves know how to tell a story beautifully. This book will be a hardcover, about the size of this magazine, but richer: 128 pages of photos and accompanying story on heavier paper.

What about the magazine? No worries! Writers in each of the three cities of the pope’s visit will be submitting marvelous magazine stories that you’ll see in our December issue. And while some of us are glued to our desks making the book, Susan and Daniel, along with Sean from our emerging media group, will head east and be feeding social-media stories to Christopher back home. You can follow it all at http://ift.tt/1JkZgx1.

This blog is taken from my “Backstory” column in St. Anthony Messenger. To subscribe, click here.

*****
Image: CNS

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Helping Brother Leo...

Posted on Aug 19, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Brother Leo was one of Francis’ first followers and closest companions, especially in the last years of Francis’ life. We have several letters from Francis to groups of people. His letter to Leo is one of only two letters to individuals.

Perhaps this letter was written by Francis after September 1224 when he received the stigmata, the five wounds of Christ’s passion, at the hermitage of La Verna. Leo brought him food there each day.

A conversation with Leo prompted Francis to write this letter, whose key section reads: “In whatever way it seems better to you to please the Lord God and to follow his footprint and poverty, do it with the blessing of the Lord God and my obedience.”

Leo may have been scrupulous and a great worrier. Francis encouraged him to come and seek advice whenever necessary—but even more to trust that the Lord God would lead him in the right way. In a sense, Francis was inviting Leo to live in greater freedom than Leo was presently experiencing. May we live in the freedom that reflects our dignity as people made in the image and likeness of God!

This blog is taken from Friar Pat’s “Dear Reader” column in St. Anthony Messenger. To subscribe, click here.

*****
Image: Saint Francis of Assisi Receiving the Stigmata, via Wikimedia Commons

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Helping Brother Leo...

Posted on Aug 19, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Brother Leo was one of Francis’ first followers and closest companions, especially in the last years of Francis’ life. We have several letters from Francis to groups of people. His letter to Leo is one of only two letters to individuals.

Perhaps this letter was written by Francis after September 1224 when he received the stigmata, the five wounds of Christ’s passion, at the hermitage of La Verna. Leo brought him food there each day.

A conversation with Leo prompted Francis to write this letter, whose key section reads: “In whatever way it seems better to you to please the Lord God and to follow his footprint and poverty, do it with the blessing of the Lord God and my obedience.”

Leo may have been scrupulous and a great worrier. Francis encouraged him to come and seek advice whenever necessary—but even more to trust that the Lord God would lead him in the right way. In a sense, Francis was inviting Leo to live in greater freedom than Leo was presently experiencing. May we live in the freedom that reflects our dignity as people made in the image and likeness of God!

This blog is taken from Friar Pat’s “Dear Reader” column in St. Anthony Messenger. To subscribe, click here.

*****
Image: Saint Francis of Assisi Receiving the Stigmata, via Wikimedia Commons

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Thank You, Murray Bodo...

Posted on Aug 18, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

For over 50 years, Father Murray Bodo, OFM, and I have been close friends, confreres, and admirers of St. Francis of Assisi. We met as fellow students in 1951 at St. Francis Minor Seminary, located on the outskirts of Cincinnati, Ohio. Murray, whose name was Louis at the time, had boarded a Greyhound Bus in his hometown of Gallup, New Mexico, and headed east some 1,500 miles on a ribbon of highway. He arrived in Cincinnati two days later.

Seminary Life

I had entered the seminary the previous year. By the time we were ordained Franciscan priests in 1963 and 1964, respectively, we had actually lived for nine years in the same Franciscan places of study—St. Francis Seminary (Cincinnati, Ohio), Duns Scotus College (Detroit, Michigan), and St. Leonard College (near Dayton, Ohio). We studied together, recreated together, and engaged in literary activities ranging from Shakespeare dramas to comedy skits during recreation. After our ordinations, we both went to Xavier University in Cincinnati and received master’s degrees in literature in 1966. We were both on our way to becoming writers.

Going Separate Ways

Murray went on to teach literature and writing to a new generation of students at St. Francis Seminary, while I taught literature at various Franciscan high schools and then at a Franciscan college-seminary near Manila in the Philippines.

In Murray’s case—jumping ahead many years—he had the opportunity to go to Assisi in 1972 and write his first best-selling book, a popular life of St. Francis called Francis: The Journey and the Dream. That same year, I came back to Cincinnati as a journalist and writer for our province’s national Catholic magazine, St. Anthony MessengerHe’s also the author of the new book Enter Assisi, which is a stunning ode to the hometown of St. Francis.

In late January of 2013, moreover, Murray’s newest book from Franciscan Media—Francis and Jesus—will begin showing up in bookstores. The cover is a Giotto fresco in dramatic color depicting St. Francis receiving the stigmata. The book may well be another best-seller! In the introduction to the book, Murray describes how St. Francis, on Mount La Verna, “received the sacred stigmata of Christ that sealed him as a visible image of the Crucified Christ.” Murray thus saw Francis as “Christ’s Lovescape,” that is, as the very image, reflection, and personification of Christ.

Our Friendship Goes On

For the last 33 years, Murray and I—as well as four other friars—have lived together in the same community in an old, three-story building, known as Pleasant Street Friary, in Cincinnati’s inner city. We hope the good Lord allows us many more years of friendship on this good earth. And may the joy of writing continue for both of us!

*****
Featured photo by Jack Wintz

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Thank You, Murray Bodo...

Posted on Aug 18, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

For over 50 years, Father Murray Bodo, OFM, and I have been close friends, confreres, and admirers of St. Francis of Assisi. We met as fellow students in 1951 at St. Francis Minor Seminary, located on the outskirts of Cincinnati, Ohio. Murray, whose name was Louis at the time, had boarded a Greyhound Bus in his hometown of Gallup, New Mexico, and headed east some 1,500 miles on a ribbon of highway. He arrived in Cincinnati two days later.

Seminary Life

I had entered the seminary the previous year. By the time we were ordained Franciscan priests in 1963 and 1964, respectively, we had actually lived for nine years in the same Franciscan places of study—St. Francis Seminary (Cincinnati, Ohio), Duns Scotus College (Detroit, Michigan), and St. Leonard College (near Dayton, Ohio). We studied together, recreated together, and engaged in literary activities ranging from Shakespeare dramas to comedy skits during recreation. After our ordinations, we both went to Xavier University in Cincinnati and received master’s degrees in literature in 1966. We were both on our way to becoming writers.

Going Separate Ways

Murray went on to teach literature and writing to a new generation of students at St. Francis Seminary, while I taught literature at various Franciscan high schools and then at a Franciscan college-seminary near Manila in the Philippines.

In Murray’s case—jumping ahead many years—he had the opportunity to go to Assisi in 1972 and write his first best-selling book, a popular life of St. Francis called Francis: The Journey and the Dream. That same year, I came back to Cincinnati as a journalist and writer for our province’s national Catholic magazine, St. Anthony MessengerHe’s also the author of the new book Enter Assisi, which is a stunning ode to the hometown of St. Francis.

In late January of 2013, moreover, Murray’s newest book from Franciscan Media—Francis and Jesus—will begin showing up in bookstores. The cover is a Giotto fresco in dramatic color depicting St. Francis receiving the stigmata. The book may well be another best-seller! In the introduction to the book, Murray describes how St. Francis, on Mount La Verna, “received the sacred stigmata of Christ that sealed him as a visible image of the Crucified Christ.” Murray thus saw Francis as “Christ’s Lovescape,” that is, as the very image, reflection, and personification of Christ.

Our Friendship Goes On

For the last 33 years, Murray and I—as well as four other friars—have lived together in the same community in an old, three-story building, known as Pleasant Street Friary, in Cincinnati’s inner city. We hope the good Lord allows us many more years of friendship on this good earth. And may the joy of writing continue for both of us!

*****
Featured photo by Jack Wintz

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Biological Warfare!...

Posted on Aug 15, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

An annual problem in the Papa Stronsay greenhouse is the Red Spider Mite (Tetranychus urticae). This mite is very small and reproduces rapidly. It feeds on the cell-material of all kinds of plants, killing the cells on which they feed. When gathered in their hundreds-of-thousands, you can imagine the havoc they can wreak in the greenhouse! We do not use chemical sprays in our greenhouse, so each year we have to introduce a second mite, Phytoseiulus persimilis, which is the natural arch-enemy of the Red Spider Mite.  It can be ordered online, and arrives in the post!

Join Fr Jean Marie, F.SS.R. as he explains how it works.
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"And now let us begin this journey, the Bishop and people, this journey of the Church of Rome, which presides in charity over all the Churches, a journey of brotherhood in love, of mutual trust. Let us always pray for one another. Let us pray for the whole world that there might be a great sense of brotherhood.

I will now give my blessing to you and to the whole world, to all men and women of good will."

-Papa Francis quote

He does not know you, yet he prays for you.
He will most likely never meet you, yet he loves you.

This is your chance to show your love, for as the Bible teaches, "Whosoever therefore shall confess me before men, him will I confess also before my Father which is in heaven. But whosoever shall deny me before men, him will I also deny before my Father which is in heaven."