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Papa Francis The First | His Holiness Papa Francisco

Biological Warfare!...

Posted on Aug 15, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

An annual problem in the Papa Stronsay greenhouse is the Red Spider Mite (Tetranychus urticae). This mite is very small and reproduces rapidly. It feeds on the cell-material of all kinds of plants, killing the cells on which they feed. When gathered in their hundreds-of-thousands, you can imagine the havoc they can wreak in the greenhouse! We do not use chemical sprays in our greenhouse, so each year we have to introduce a second mite, Phytoseiulus persimilis, which is the natural arch-enemy of the Red Spider Mite.  It can be ordered online, and arrives in the post!

Join Fr Jean Marie, F.SS.R. as he explains how it works.
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The Pope on Capitol Hill–Part 2...

Posted on Aug 13, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Our guest blogger today is Daniel Imwalle, assistant editor of St. Anthony Messenger. To see Part 1 of this article, please click here.

The pope’s address to Congress may be an opportunity to expand upon his critique of trickle-down economics. In his first papal exhortation, “The Joy of the Gospel,” Pope Francis pointed out that blindly putting trust in the invisible hand of the free market “expresses a crude and naive trust in the goodness of those wielding economic power and in the sacralized workings of the prevailing economic system. Meanwhile, the excluded are still waiting” (54).

Who are “the excluded” in the United States, a nation of 321 million people? In a report published on the US Census Bureau’s website (census.gov), as of 2013, the number of Americans living in poverty is over 45 million. Meanwhile, The New York Times reported in December 2014 that the wealth gap between upper-income families and middle- and lower-income families is the widest it’s ever been since the Federal Reserve started tracking this data 30 years ago. Perhaps the pope will encourage Congress to consider equitable economic policies that can narrow the wealth gap and reduce poverty.

“God is not afraid of new things.”  —Pope Francis

The pope may challenge our leaders and our nation to address other societal woes, too. Still, we may be afraid of embracing new and developing immigrant populations and wish to avoid the growing pains that come along with cultural exchange. We might also be resistant to making lifestyle changes that serve to support a more ethical form of capitalism. During the October 2014 beatification Mass for Pope Paul VI, Pope Francis said, “God is not afraid of new things.” Human beings, on the other hand, often are.

Our faith calls us to be more like God. Opening our minds and our hearts to what promises to be the pope’s challenging message to the United States, we can take a confident step in that holy direction.

Franciscan Media is partnering with the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, the Catholic News Service, and the Libreria Editrice Vaticana, the Vatican’s official publishing house to publish the Official Commemorative Edition of Pope Francis’ first-ever trip to the United States.

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CNS photo/Paul Haring

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The Pope on Capitol Hill–Part 2...

Posted on Aug 13, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Our guest blogger today is Daniel Imwalle, assistant editor of St. Anthony Messenger. To see Part 1 of this article, please click here.

The pope’s address to Congress may be an opportunity to expand upon his critique of trickle-down economics. In his first papal exhortation, “The Joy of the Gospel,” Pope Francis pointed out that blindly putting trust in the invisible hand of the free market “expresses a crude and naive trust in the goodness of those wielding economic power and in the sacralized workings of the prevailing economic system. Meanwhile, the excluded are still waiting” (54).

Who are “the excluded” in the United States, a nation of 321 million people? In a report published on the US Census Bureau’s website (census.gov), as of 2013, the number of Americans living in poverty is over 45 million. Meanwhile, The New York Times reported in December 2014 that the wealth gap between upper-income families and middle- and lower-income families is the widest it’s ever been since the Federal Reserve started tracking this data 30 years ago. Perhaps the pope will encourage Congress to consider equitable economic policies that can narrow the wealth gap and reduce poverty.

“God is not afraid of new things.”  —Pope Francis

The pope may challenge our leaders and our nation to address other societal woes, too. Still, we may be afraid of embracing new and developing immigrant populations and wish to avoid the growing pains that come along with cultural exchange. We might also be resistant to making lifestyle changes that serve to support a more ethical form of capitalism. During the October 2014 beatification Mass for Pope Paul VI, Pope Francis said, “God is not afraid of new things.” Human beings, on the other hand, often are.

Our faith calls us to be more like God. Opening our minds and our hearts to what promises to be the pope’s challenging message to the United States, we can take a confident step in that holy direction.

Franciscan Media is partnering with the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, the Catholic News Service, and the Libreria Editrice Vaticana, the Vatican’s official publishing house to publish the Official Commemorative Edition of Pope Francis’ first-ever trip to the United States.

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CNS photo/Paul Haring

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How do we handle immigration?...

Posted on Aug 12, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

You can’t hardly go a day or two without seeing something in the headlines that relates to immigration. And it’s not just in the US that this is happening, but around the world. People are looking for stability and safety and many times aren’t finding it in their home country. It can be confusing for us as Catholic Christians to know what our response ought to be. Should we let everyone who wants to live here settle in? Can we handle the influx of humanity? Do we view this as a problem or do we look at this as an opportunity that needs to be managed properly?

In Pope Francis’ document, Joy of the Gospel, he has this to say about having a missionary heart in all we do. He says, “A missionary heart never closes itself off, never retreats into its own security, never opts for rigidity and defensiveness. It realizes that it has to grow in its own understanding of the Gospel and in discerning the paths of the Spirit, and so it always does what good it can, even if in the process, its shoes get soiled by the mud of the street.”

That quote speaks to me about how difficult it can sometimes be to follow what the Gospel is urging us to do. The path of the Spirit is not always neat, clean and easy to discern. If you’ve ever accidentally stepped into a squishy, wet, pile of mud, you know just how hard it is to clean that off of your shoes. Sometimes discerning what to do in a complex situation, like immigration, can be messy.

There’s a pragmatic way to address immigration as well as an emotional and faith-filled way to address immigration. As Catholic Christians we need to be aware and deliberate about making sure we see this issue from as many angles as we possibly can. And sometimes one of those angles involves navigating around a pile of mud. Fortunately, we have a document like Pope Francis’ to help us through. So don’t be shy. Jump on in and get dirty.

*****

Photo by Denis and Yulia Pogostins/Shutterstock

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How do we handle immigration?...

Posted on Aug 12, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

You can’t hardly go a day or two without seeing something in the headlines that relates to immigration. And it’s not just in the US that this is happening, but around the world. People are looking for stability and safety and many times aren’t finding it in their home country. It can be confusing for us as Catholic Christians to know what our response ought to be. Should we let everyone who wants to live here settle in? Can we handle the influx of humanity? Do we view this as a problem or do we look at this as an opportunity that needs to be managed properly?

In Pope Francis’ document, Joy of the Gospel, he has this to say about having a missionary heart in all we do. He says, “A missionary heart never closes itself off, never retreats into its own security, never opts for rigidity and defensiveness. It realizes that it has to grow in its own understanding of the Gospel and in discerning the paths of the Spirit, and so it always does what good it can, even if in the process, its shoes get soiled by the mud of the street.”

That quote speaks to me about how difficult it can sometimes be to follow what the Gospel is urging us to do. The path of the Spirit is not always neat, clean and easy to discern. If you’ve ever accidentally stepped into a squishy, wet, pile of mud, you know just how hard it is to clean that off of your shoes. Sometimes discerning what to do in a complex situation, like immigration, can be messy.

There’s a pragmatic way to address immigration as well as an emotional and faith-filled way to address immigration. As Catholic Christians we need to be aware and deliberate about making sure we see this issue from as many angles as we possibly can. And sometimes one of those angles involves navigating around a pile of mud. Fortunately, we have a document like Pope Francis’ to help us through. So don’t be shy. Jump on in and get dirty.

*****

Photo by Denis and Yulia Pogostins/Shutterstock

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Love at the Heart of L’Arche...

Posted on Aug 11, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Today’s blog is from the book The Gospel of John, The Gospel of Relationship by Jean Vanier.

At L’Arche we discovered quite early the importance of the washing of the feet. It is especially important for us because the people we serve are living with a disability of some sort, and may not always understand the Word of God or a text. So the gesture accompanying a text takes on a new importance.

In washing each other’s feet on the Thursday before Easter, we have discovered that it is a moment of grace, an important moment, something that reveals the presence of Jesus and of the Holy Spirit. We are there to serve each other, to create a body together. The great longing of Jesus is for unity, the unity of all Christians, and the unity of all of the human family. To wash each other’s feet is to fulfill in one way the prayer of Jesus “that they may be one.”

During a meeting in Northern Ireland, I spoke to the leaders of various churches about Jesus washing the feet of his disciples. The Irish cardinal, some Catholic bishops, and the primate, as well as several bishops of the Church of Ireland and the Moderators of the Presbyterians and the Methodists, were present. After I had spoken of this gesture of Jesus, we washed each other’s feet in little groups and prayed over one another.

Cardinal Sean Baptist Brady of Ireland spoke in the synod in Rome a few months later about that washing of the feet. He said it was a gesture of intercommunion between people of different churches and from different ecclesiastical communities. Although we cannot always participate together in the Eucharist, and eat the Body of Jesus together, we can at least wash each other’s feet, in a moment of grace and unity. What Jesus wants is to bring together in unity all the dispersed children of God.

I lived another such experience, at the World Council of Churches in Geneva, where there were gathered 230 delegates from many different churches. There again we spoke together of the importance of the washing of the feet, and then we washed each other’s feet. To see an Orthodox bishop wash the feet of an American Baptist woman pastor was very moving. It is such gestures that progressively will lead us toward unity.

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General Council of the Congregation...

Posted on Aug 8, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Notice

The General Chapter of the Congregation of the Sons of the Most Holy Redeemer are happy to announce the election of the General Consultors of the Congregation.

Vicar General: Very Reverend Father Anthony Mary, F.SS.R.
First Consultor: Reverend Father Magdala Maria, F.SS.R.
Second Consultor: Reverend Brother Nicodemus Mary, F.SS.R.
Third Consultor: Reverend Brother Martin Mary, F.SS.R. 

The term of the Offices is for six years.

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General Council of the Congregation...

Posted on Aug 8, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Notice

The General Chapter of the Congregation of the Sons of the Most Holy Redeemer are happy to announce the election of the General Consultors of the Congregation.

Vicar General: Very Reverend Father Anthony Mary, F.SS.R.
First Consultor: Reverend Father Magdala Maria, F.SS.R.
Second Consultor: Reverend Brother Nicodemus Mary, F.SS.R.
Third Consultor: Reverend Brother Martin Mary, F.SS.R. 

The term of the Offices is for six years.

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Meeting God in the Middle...

Posted on Aug 7, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Today’s guest blogger is Nick Luken, a fourth-year student at The Ohio State University, majoring in English and minoring in professional writing. Nick graduated from Roger Bacon, a Franciscan high school in Cincinnati, in 2012.

I’ve lost count of the number of times that I’ve been told by Christians of all denominations that what God desires most for all of His children is a deep and loving relationship with God. I’ve also lost count of the number of different ways that people have said we go about developing our relationships with God. Everyone has a unique set of gifts from the Lord, and with that comes a unique way to encounter Him. Even with the myriad of different ways for us to deepen our relationships with the Lord, though, there are some striking similarities among all of them.

No matter what gifts the Lord has given to us, our relationship with Him must be two-way. Like any human relationship, our relationship with God relies on both visitation and invitation. We must both visit the Lord in what we designate as “His space” and invite Him into what we designate as “our space.” It’s like a dating relationship.

For a boyfriend-girlfriend relationship to really blossom, there ought to be a balance between the two parties. If one or the other is lacking, tension can arise. I know that I would be a little put off if a long-term girlfriend of mine never invited me to spend time with her friends or family. And I’m sure she would feel similarly uncomfortable if the reverse was true. A strong relationship is one where the people involved are comfortable enough with each other to meet both ways.

In the same way, I think we all should try to meet God both ways. We certainly ought to attend Mass regularly, thus meeting God in His space, but we also ought to take time to recognize the Lord’s presence in our daily lives, thus inviting Him into our space. And we should definitely go out of our way to pray not just in churches, but in our homes, again inviting God into our space. We should also try to meet the Lord in Adoration or other times of prayer within His space. By meeting God both ways, we can deepen our relationship in ways that would never be possible otherwise, ultimately allowing us to unite our space with His in the Kingdom of God.

Photo:

Featured Photo: Freedigitalphotos.net

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Meeting God in the Middle...

Posted on Aug 7, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Today’s guest blogger is Nick Luken, a fourth-year student at The Ohio State University, majoring in English and minoring in professional writing. Nick graduated from Roger Bacon, a Franciscan high school in Cincinnati, in 2012.

I’ve lost count of the number of times that I’ve been told by Christians of all denominations that what God desires most for all of His children is a deep and loving relationship with God. I’ve also lost count of the number of different ways that people have said we go about developing our relationships with God. Everyone has a unique set of gifts from the Lord, and with that comes a unique way to encounter Him. Even with the myriad of different ways for us to deepen our relationships with the Lord, though, there are some striking similarities among all of them.

No matter what gifts the Lord has given to us, our relationship with Him must be two-way. Like any human relationship, our relationship with God relies on both visitation and invitation. We must both visit the Lord in what we designate as “His space” and invite Him into what we designate as “our space.” It’s like a dating relationship.

For a boyfriend-girlfriend relationship to really blossom, there ought to be a balance between the two parties. If one or the other is lacking, tension can arise. I know that I would be a little put off if a long-term girlfriend of mine never invited me to spend time with her friends or family. And I’m sure she would feel similarly uncomfortable if the reverse was true. A strong relationship is one where the people involved are comfortable enough with each other to meet both ways.

In the same way, I think we all should try to meet God both ways. We certainly ought to attend Mass regularly, thus meeting God in His space, but we also ought to take time to recognize the Lord’s presence in our daily lives, thus inviting Him into our space. And we should definitely go out of our way to pray not just in churches, but in our homes, again inviting God into our space. We should also try to meet the Lord in Adoration or other times of prayer within His space. By meeting God both ways, we can deepen our relationship in ways that would never be possible otherwise, ultimately allowing us to unite our space with His in the Kingdom of God.

Photo:

Featured Photo: Freedigitalphotos.net

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Habemus Patrem!...

Posted on Aug 6, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

The Sons of the Most Holy Redeemer are pleased and proud to announce that today, the Feast of the Transfiguration of Our Lord, the election of the Rector Major of the Congregation was held on the Holy Island of Papa Stronsay, overseen by His Lordship Bishop Hugh Gilbert of Aberdeen, and that Very Rev Fr Michael Mary, F.SS.R. was elected to govern our Congregation for a further six years.  Deo Gratias et Mariæ!
The newly elected Rector Major, Very Rev. Fr Michael Mary, F.SS.R., kneels before the altar and makes the acts of Profession of Faith and Fidelity to the Church.
 Having been installed as Rector Major by the Bishop, Very Rev. Fr Michael gives the Pax (Peace) to Fr Anthony Mary, F.SS.R.
 Each member of the Congregation demonstrates their submission and fidelity to the new Rector Major by kneeling before him and placing their joined hands between his.
 The bells joyfully cry out:
Habemus Patrem!
 The members of the Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer currently living on Papa Stronsay, with their bishop, Dom Hugh Gilbert, O.S.B. following the installation ceremony.
Very Rev. Fr Michael Mary with the eleven voting members.
Thanks be to God for blessing His “Most Small Institute”!
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Papal Visit in September...

Posted on Aug 6, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Pope Francis is coming in September. There’s lots of excitement and plans are now finalized for the most part. Today, Franciscan Media received an attractive mailing from the USCCB Communications Office describing all the preparations already made and asking the question: Are you ready?

Catholic News Service is preparing for complete coverage of the Papal visit from Rome, to Havana, to Washington, New York and Philadelphia. News releases will be in English and Spanish with some coverage in French. Experienced journalists and photographers have been enlisted to provide first-hand original reporting. CNS and Franciscan Media will prepare a commemorative book of Pope Francis’ historic visit.

The papal visit will be a major event in the life of the Catholic Church in the United States and in Cuba. Pope Francis will draw the attention of international reporters and of pundits. Issues like marriage, poverty, religious liberty and global warming are likely on the agenda of the pope, not to mention terrorism and the persecution of Christians in the Middle East.

After his arrival in Washington, DC, the pope will canonize Blessed Junipero Serra during a Mass at the Basilica of the Immaculate Conception on September 23. Pope Francis will be welcomed to the White House that same day. On September 24 the pope will address a joint session of the U.S. Congress. Then he travels to New York to address the United Nations General Assembly on September 25.

The World Meeting of Families which runs from September 22-27 is the final destination on the pope’s schedule. He arrives in Philadelphia on Saturday, September 26. The Festival of Families and the Papal Mass on Sunday September 27 will attract huge crowds.

The public actions and speeches of the pope will make the news across the globe. If his track record is any indication, Pope Francis will surprise his watchers as well as the sheep of his vast flock. Welcome, Pope Francis!

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Latin Tweet from Pope Francis...

Posted on Aug 6, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Rancisrancis tweeted:

Viam amori Dei in cordibus nostris demus ut demus ex nostris cordibus aliis nosmetipsos.

Discuss!

(Hint… note the style!)

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Latin Tweet from Pope Francis...

Posted on Aug 5, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Rancisrancis tweeted:

Viam amori Dei in cordibus nostris demus ut demus ex nostris cordibus aliis nosmetipsos.

Discuss!

(Hint… note the style!)

FacebookEmailPinterestGoogle GmailShare/Bookmark

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Pope Francis’ General Audience on the divorced a...

Posted on Aug 5, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Buy this if you haven’t already.If you have already bought it, buy more copies and give them to people.

At his Wednesday General Audience, His Holiness Pope Francis spoke on the situation of the divorced and civilly remarried.   The MSM has inadequate reports about what the Pope said.

First, let’s be clear about something.

People who marry in the Church and then civilly divorce and then civilly marry someone else, are out of sync with their true spouse, with the Church, and the Christ.  They are still married to their true spouse in the eyes of the Church because they are still married in the eyes of Christ.  Because they are living out of sync with the truth, they cannot be admitted to Holy Communion.  Furthermore, it they are not willing to amend their lives in an appropriate way, they cannot be given absolution.  Their situation is spiritually perilous and, often, it gives public scandal (i.e., it undermines the social fabric and makes it easier, by their bad example, for others to do the same and think that it’s okay).

Here’s what the Pope said (not my translation – my emphases and comments):

Dear Brothers and Sisters, good morning!

With this catechesis we take up again our reflection on the family. After speaking last time of wounded families caused by the misunderstanding of spouses, today I would like to focus our attention on another reality: how to take care of those that, following the irreversible failure of their marital bond, have undertaken a new union. [i.e, divorced and civilly remarried.  The “union” they have undertaken may be recognized by the state but it is not recognized by the Church, because it is not recognized by Christ.]

The Church knows well that such a situation contradicts the Christian Sacrament.  [Get that?] However, her look of teacher draws always from her heart of mother; [Do I detect Google Translate at work?  This is tricky, but it is closer to something like “Her teacherly gaze draws upon her motherly heart…”] a heart that, animated by the Holy Spirit, always seeks the good and salvation of persons. See why she feels the duty, “for love of truth,” to “discern the situations well.” Saint John Paul II expressed himself thus in the Apostolic Exhortation Familiaris consortio (n. 84), pointing out, for instance, the difference between one who has suffered the separation and one who has caused it. This discernment must be made. [Recently, the Instrumentum Laboris for the upcoming October Synod mistranslated Familiaris consortio 83. HERE]

If, then, we look at these new bonds with the eyes of little ones – and the little ones are looking – with the eyes of children, we see even more the urgency to develop in our communities a real acceptance of persons that live such situations.  [I must ask: Are these people not being accepted far and wide?  What is “acceptance” in this context?] Therefore, it is important that the style of the community, its language, its attitudes are always attentive to persons, beginning with the little ones. They are the ones who suffer the most, in these situations. [One might add here that, if we are to be most attentive to the children in these situations, perhaps parents should avoid choices that will hurt those children and… stay together.  There may be some few situations where separation is necessary but, for the most part, if people strive to overcome their passions and appetites and selfishness and choose to act for the good of their children, many of these “broken” marriages can be avoided.  Perhaps that’s where we ought to put our efforts as a Church right now: helping to heal marriages that are struggling rather than try to “fix” something that’s broken with quick fixes?] Otherwise, how will we be able to recommend to these parents to do their utmost to educate the children in the Christian life, giving them the example of a convinced and practiced faith, if we hold them at a distance from the life of the community, as if they were excommunicated? [Perhaps telling children the truth about the situation could be a good start: Holy Communion can be received in the state of grace.  That’s a start.  Also, is it possible that children seeing that their parents do not receive Communion and who then explain why would be giving in a powerful way an “example of a convinced and practiced faith”?  We must not not not slip into the trap of thinking that reception of Communion is obligatory for the daily practice of the Faith.  Sometimes we practice our Faith by not receiving Communion.  We violate our Faith and give a bad example of the Faith to others when we receive Communion when we shouldn’t and people know we shouldn’t (which could be the situation of pro-abortion politicians, openly homosexual persons in civil unions, and the divorced and remarried.] We must proceed in such a way as not to add other weights beyond those that the children, in these situations, already have to bear! Unfortunately, the number of these children and youngsters is truly great. It is important that they feel the Church as a mother attentive to all, always willing to listen and to come together.  [How true this is.  And how true it also is that people who are divorced and remarried are still obliged to teach their children the Faith and are still obliged to attend Holy Mass on days of obligation (including every Sunday, of course).  They must still practice their Catholic Faith even though they cannot be admitted to Holy Communion while their manifestly discordant situation continues.  Sometimes a Mother has to say “No.”]

In these decades, in truth, the Church has not been either insensitive or slow. Thanks to the reflection carried out by Pastors, guided and confirmed by my Predecessors, the awareness has greatly grown that a fraternal and attentive acceptance is necessary, in love and in truth, [truth] of the baptized that have established a new coexistence after the failure of their sacramental marriage; [I am not sure of what that means.  I am unaware that there was a lack of “coexistence” with people whose marriages failed.  What am I missing?  The Church is always available to them, even if they are not able to frequent the sacraments while their relationship is disordered.] in fact, these people are not at all excommunicated, they are not excommunicated! And they are absolutely not treated as such: they are always part of the Church.  [Again, I am not sure what this means.  Are there places in the world where the remarried are being shunned as if they old category of vitandus was still in force?  It is true that the divorced and remarried are not excommunicated.  No authority in the Church is saying that they are.  That said, it remains true that people in these situations share a burden of those who are excommunicated: they may not receive Communion.  The excommunicated may not receive sacramental absolution until the censure is lifted (or in some cases until the process of lifting the censure has been initiated through a confessor).  The remarried, however, not being excommunicated, can seek the Sacrament of Penance and they can receive absolution provided that they have a firm purpose of amendment of their lives!  The Church does not say that the remarried cannot confess their sins.  The Church says that a person who is in the state of mortal sin (whatever that sin is) who has no intention to amend his life cannot be absolved.]

Pope Benedict XVI intervened on this question, soliciting careful discernment and wise pastoral support, knowing that “simple recipes” do not exist (Address to the 7th World Meeting of Families, Milan, June 2, 2012, answer n. 5).

Hence the repeated invitations of Pastors to manifest openly and consistently the community’s willingness to receive and encourage them, so that they live and develop increasingly their belonging to Christ and to the Church with prayer, with listening to the Word of God, with frequenting of the liturgy, with the Christian education of the children, with charity and service to the poor, with commitment to justice and peace. [cf. Familiaris consortio 83.]

The biblical icon of the Good Shepherd (John 10:11-18), summarizes the mission that Jesus received from the Father: to give his life for the sheep. This attitude is also a model for the Church, which receives her children as a mother that gives her life for them. “The Church is called to be always the open House of the Father […]” No closed doors! No closed doors! “All can participate in some way in ecclesial life, all can form part of the community. The Church […] is the paternal home where there is a place for each one with his difficult life” (Apostolic Exhortation Evangelii Gaudium, n. 47). [Again, this is all correct, but… are there places in the world where doors are being closed in the faces of the divorced and remarried?  I don’t know of any.  And… sometimes a good Mother must say “No.”]

In the same way all Christians are called to imitate the Good Shepherd. Above all Christian families can collaborate with Him by taking care of wounded families, supporting them in the community’s life of faith. [The Spiritual Works of Mercy apply.] May each one do his part in assuming the attitude of the Good Shepherd, who knows each one of his sheep and excludes no one from his infinite love!

A passionate call from Pope Francis to reach out to people who are in irregular marriages!

I will repeat here what I say at Sunday Masses: Never underestimate the power of an invitation.  Be inviting to people who are estranged from the Church!   You never know how your invitation might be the little drop of healing balm in a grace-filled moment that stirs a wounded heart and mind to deeper conversion.

Invite people to come to Mass.

Invite people to go to confession with you.

The Ordinary Synod is coming.  Between now and then, especially in September, there will be a torrent of pieces – especially from the Left, which seek to undermine the Church’s teachings in the name of “mercy”.  They will portray those who uphold the Church’s teachings as being against “mercy”.

But “mercy” without truth is not merciful.

I urge all of you, especially pastors of souls, to obtain the so-called Five Cardinals Book™, Remaining in the Truth of Christ: Marriage and Communion in the Catholic Church.  The essays in this book provide a useful overview and response to all the issues that are being raised.  Also, priests have communicated how useful this book is as a resource in the preparation of couples for marriage.

BTW… another book is on the way.  More about that later.

The moderation queue is ON.

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"And now let us begin this journey, the Bishop and people, this journey of the Church of Rome, which presides in charity over all the Churches, a journey of brotherhood in love, of mutual trust. Let us always pray for one another. Let us pray for the whole world that there might be a great sense of brotherhood.

I will now give my blessing to you and to the whole world, to all men and women of good will."

-Papa Francis quote

He does not know you, yet he prays for you.
He will most likely never meet you, yet he loves you.

This is your chance to show your love, for as the Bible teaches, "Whosoever therefore shall confess me before men, him will I confess also before my Father which is in heaven. But whosoever shall deny me before men, him will I also deny before my Father which is in heaven."